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Misophonia Misophonia is a relatively unexplored chronic condition in which a person experiences autonomic arousal (analogous to an involuntary “fight-or-flight” response) to certain innocuous or repetitive sounds such as chewing, pen clicking, and lip smacking. Misophonics report anxiety, panic, and rage when exposed to trigger sounds, compromising their ...


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I will just show the statistics of last attempt to mimic the brain process. Last year Japan launched there fastest supercomputer: K computer OR SPARC64 VIIIfx 2.0GHz Features: Manufacturer: Fujitsu Cores: 705,024 Linpack Performance (Rmax) 10,510 TFlop/s Theoretical Peak (Rpeak) 11,280.4 TFlop/s Power: 12,659.89 kW Memory: 1,410,048 GB ...


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Neuroscience doesn't really have a clear model for what a "thought" consists of exactly. Certain processes that are involved in thought have begun to be mapped--for example, this recent paper talks about a model for how the brain associates location in space with it's own mental map (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24462102, I'll try to find something ...


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It's very likely that memory is "lossy" and holographic, such that you can keep adding more information indefinitely, but retain it with less and less accuracy. Memory isn't a digital storage system with X gigabytes of capacity, and the inputs to memory aren't neat little packets. What we remember are a web of associations and patterns. Vastly ...


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There are an estimated 100 billion neurons within the human brain. In general a minor variation in the number of neurons should not effect individuals too much, however when there is a more significant loss, such as brain injury or in some forms of dementia cognitive abilities do decline. So in this sense yes the number of neurons does relate to ...


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Three possible mechanisms are mentioned in the first referenced article [1]: Attentional blink - the failure to detect a (visual) stimulus [2]. Visual short-term memory - non-permanent storage of visual information over an extended period of time [3]. Psychological refractory period - the period of time during which the response to a second stimulus is ...


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Yes, there is a limit: Despite the impressive complexity and processing power of the human brain, it is severely capacity limited [1]. Human brain has 78.82– 95.40 billion neurons [2] and about $3.6 \cdot 10^{14}$ synapses in the cortex [3]. We shouldn't worry about running out of space, because neurons connect with each other to exponentially increase ...


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There have been quite a few studies on stimulating the brain with electrical pulses and it has been found to be successful too. Three papers of particular interest I found were: 1) In a study titled "Explaining How Brain Stimulation Can Evoke Memories", it was found that electrical stimulation in the temporal neocortex can cause neurosurgical patients to ...


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I think that the advantages of using both hands with equal ease is quite evident whether it be sports, at your work or while you are doing your household chores. An obvious advantage is using both hands to write or draw with both at the same time. I would be focusing on the disadvantages that may be faced. 1) Ambidextrous people are more prone to ...


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Yes, but rarely. Other types of brain cells are much more likely to form tumors. Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and more generally glial cells all form tumors with some regularity. Nerve sheaths can also form benign growths. Nerves themselves can even manifest cancerous behavior, even though they are nearly always benign and very slow growing. ...



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