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Yes, when you are dreaming, brain activity increases ( called the REM phase because of the effect of the increased neural activity: rapid eye movements ). You can tell this by looking at the EEG, from witch we can state that our brain is more active and therefore is consuming more energy, making the regenerative effect of the sleeping less efficient. ...


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It's possible that they do, depending on the intensity of the dream and the amount of brain activity. For example, if the dreamer is thinking too much or is having a dream that's way too intense, the brain activity goes up and they're not as rested. However, lucid dreaming can be good for sleep if the dreamer creates a more relaxed dream. This can ...


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Short answer External stimuli can drive autonomic responses. Background The autonomic nervous system is a visceral sensory and motor system. The viscera are the internal organs. Virtually all visceral reflexes are mediated by local circuits in the brain stem or spinal cord (Fig. 1). It is one of two major subdivisions of the nervous system; the other being ...


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Regeneration... What a lovely word since 2010 You could start with This text published on 2010 which shows how P21 and it's controller(P53 gene) could regulate regeneration of mammalians' body parts and within them is neurons too. Regeneration of a hole on ear of MRL mouse or p21 knockout one This event was accidentally observed ten years before the text ...


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Neural regeneration is addressed broadly in this chapter from a book published in 2013 (though I would say for a topic such as this, you're probably going to want to read primary literature or recent, less comprehensive reviews in addition to any book chapters published in the few years): Neural Regeneration by Melissa M. Steward, Akshayalakshmi Sridhar, ...



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