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Plants do have uncontrolled tumorous growth. Though in almost all known cases, it is pathogen induced; such as in the case of the bacterium- Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Viruses can also induce plant tumors. Theoretically, the cell wall will pose a mechanical barrier to cell division. Also, cell wall synthesis is an extra biochemical step during cell division. ...


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The TCGA Project has been collecting primary tumors and matched normals per patient per cancer indication and has been exome (WXS) profiling those samples, and genome (WGS) profiling a subset of them. In those cases, the primary tumor is tissue collected from the primary tumor and the matched normal is usually a blood samples, but could be derived from a ...


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This is highly unlikely because the immune system would detect these cells and atack them as foreign. There is at least one case described in the literature in which a woman died of lung cancer after receiving a donor organ from a smoker. This is due to the fact that after transplantations people have to take drugs to suppress their immune system to avoid an ...


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Most of us have had the apoptotic process in our B-lymphocytes disrupted when we had infectious mononucleosis, caused by the EBV virus. The EBV virus (pardon the virus-virus) encodes proteins, including one that mimics a host cell protein, Bcl-2, which plays an important role in apoptosis. The set of virus 'decoy' proteins forces the infected cell to ...


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Lot's of ways. Apoptosis is complex, but falls under two pathways ending up at caspase 3. Anywhere in the pathway may there be a problem but also in things that trigger the pathway. For example in cancer there is loss of tumour suppressors which ensure a damaged cell undergoes apoptosis or prevents replication and oncogenes which allow controlled ...


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The definition of a tumor is a population of cells that: Divides out-of-control 2.. Does not exhibit apoptosis 3.. Does not differentiate Additionally the two-hit hypothesis states that at least two genes need to be involved. There are many genes, predominantly involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, that when their function is disrupted the ...


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One long standing hypothesis of cancer formation is that it originates in a 'wound that never heals'. I was about to add that there is little hard evidence for wounding as a significant cause of cancers but Google found this fascinating report on Marjolin's Ulcers which I had never heard of. Whether it was the wound or a comorbid virus or something ...


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The answer is it depends. First, take a step back from the definitions of "cancer" versus "normal" cell and recognize that cells and tissues can undergo a variety of changes in their growth. A solid cancer/tumor (as its usually defined) is something that grows and invades the surrounding tissue. A spectrum of possible cell growth can be : normal -> ...


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From how I read your question, you're wondering if there is some technology to somehow isolate oncogenic proteins inside the cell so they don't do harm, is that correct? The answer is somewhat complicated, as it depends on the protein. First, though, you need to understand that cancer is a very complex disease, and cancer is not caused by a single mutation ...



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