Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

In the most technical sense, yes. In a practical sense, no. Average background radiation dose from food and water sources is ~.3 mSv according to the UN. Given that it takes 1 full Sv to increase cancer risk by ~5-6%, it seems unlikely that, under normal conditions, variability in consumption of water will change risk in a significant fashion. Now, when ...


1

In cancer cells, the telomerase is not "formed" but activated, mainly due to an amplification and a gain of copy of the 5p chromosome arm, containing the gene coding for TERT. For example, a very common way to immortalize primary cells to establish a cell line is to stably express TERT. Shortened telomeres initiates DNA damage response pathways, resulting ...


2

Welcome to stack. This is a good question. To answer your question: Generally, yes. Howeve like @user137 stated below it can depend on many factors most notably how many division cycles they go through, and also where they metastasize to. The immediate environment of a cell is very effective at altering gene expression. I use Hepg2 cells regularly. ...


2

No. When a different blood type is introduced in the body, the host immune system recognizes the foreign blood as non-self and attacks it. The transfused blood becomes useless, and the potentially massive immune reaction can cause shock, which itself can be fatal. More details in the book Blood Groups and Red Cell Antigens, which can be found at the NCBI ...



Top 50 recent answers are included