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This study has received next to no media coverage. With RFR impacting so many people it makes me wonder, is this study valid? Well first of all, lets be clear: that is not a study. Its a review article, basically a paper that summarizes a series of studies published. The review itself isn't valid or invalid necessarily, it simply takes a series of ...


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http://www.pnas.org/content/89/16/7683.abstract I study sharks and magnetism and I am finding some distressing information regarding electromagnetic waves affects and effects on the human body. My current research is leading towards showing the cause of Alzheimer's and possibly blood clotting but I'm not sure about cancer. There are so many different ...


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And the naysayers are always the first to respond. Considering EMF health research has been almost totally co-opted by Industry supported scientists in the last 10 years and perhaps the blog critics as well, you can find oodles of science negating the 100s to 1000s of research studies showing the plethora of EMF- RF adverse effects. Those studies that do ...


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Understanding the link between the size of the tumor mutanome and its immunogenicity requires a basic understanding of T-cell development and regulation. When normal human cells degrade proteins via the proteasome, some fragments of these proteins, called peptides, are bound to specialized cell-surface proteins called MHC. T-cells express a specialized ...


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I think, a story about Alexis Carrel and Leonard Hayflick is appropriate here. In the beginning of 20th century a Nobel prize-winning medicist/biologist Alexis Carrel published a series of papers, claiming that growth of a culture of cells of normal somatic differentiated tissue can be maintained indefinitely without undergoing cellular senescence. This ...


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This is not an idea I'm trying to make, obviously, I just couldn't get it off my mind and wanted to see what is wrong and if it is fixable. Since everybody else is giving you a bad attitude in the comments... While it might work for some cancers, it is completely impractical for the majority of cancers. SOME cancers do occur because of a specific ...


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Terminology involved makes everything lie a bit. All the "immortality" and so complicate things a bit. We perceive life as life of our individual bodies. Thus if our body is immortal, that means that it is persistent, without us bothering about our individual cells. But, there isn't any distinction like that in single cell organisms where cells themselves ...


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There are lots and lots of specific single mutations that cause problems with apoptosis. Some of the most common are in P53, PTEN, MYC, APC, and KRAS. If you want a specific amino acid change, KRAS G12D is particularly potent. It works by disabling a regulatory domain and causing KRAS to be constitutively active. These aren't "reversible" in a strict sense ...


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I don't think that there is a one-size-fits-all answer to this question. There are different types of arrest and there might be different triggers depending on the epithelial cell type. Even in the cited Hammond et al paper, note that the effect of serum is not an immediate arrest. Human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) could already go through 3 to 4 ...



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