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Apoptosis is very tightly controlled for obvious reasons. Setting it off without proper control would result in the uncontrolled loss of cells. Apoptosis is one of the major pathways which are either mutated or shut-off in cancers, preventing the body from eliminating malingnant cells. These two papers are interesting in this context: Apoptosis: A Review ...


1

It is both, a and b. The JAK-STAT-Pathway sits below the Erb-receptor and is therefore giving the signal from mutated Erb down the signalling cascade. Besides that a permanent active version of Jak2 has been found which also permanently activates this pathway. Both are contributing to cancer. See this two articles: Molecular Pathways: JAK/STAT Pathway: ...


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i thnk it is MAP Kinase pathway b'coz RAS is a protein involved in this pathway and mutation in it lead to permanent attachment of GTP leading to cell proliferation causing carcer


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There's this database of genetic/drug interactions, which I think is pretty much exactly what you're looking for. Probably your best approach is to classify your drugs into a couple different categories of action. Some drugs will have to be in several categories at once(I'm lookin at you anthracyclines) Dose-dependent mutagens(cisplatin), growth-dependent ...


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All mutagens are potential carcinogens. Unless the mutagen is highly specific to a site. HPV is not carcinogenic. It causes oncogenic transformation of a cell because of certain proteins that it codes for. Retroviruses can randomly integrate near an oncogene and cause oncogenic transformation (This is a mutation in principle. Not a point mutation though. ...


0

I'm no expert on the matter, but just quoting from Wikipedia: Mutagens are not necessarily carcinogens, and vice versa. Sodium Azide for example may be mutagenic (and highly toxic), but it has not been shown to be carcinogenic. It cites Toxicology And Carcinogenesis Studies Of Sodium Azide. So it would appear the answer is no. Not all mutagens ...


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I would caution you against using phrases such as "completely cured" or even "cured". This goes beyond our technical ability to detect the presence of tumor cells within someone's body. All we can conclude is progression-free survival (i.e. living with cancer that does not get worse) or disease-free survival (i.e. or no signs or symptoms of the tumor). Many ...



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