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I would go with NO for the simple reason: For a cell to become malignant (cancerous), cells need to break several barriers. One is to be able to activate telomerase, an enzyme that restores telomeres and enables infinite cell divisions. Another important part is to be able to ignore apoptosis. This is programmed cell death. Specific cell signals lead to ...


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In a word: mutation. If you step back and think about it, multicellular organisms are really, really complex systems. Different cells have to do different kinds of things and interact with each other, they form organized tissues and organs and so on. That much is obvious. For all of this to work in concert, cells have to grow and divide (to replace dying ...


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This is a very general answer to a very general question. So, in general, cancer occurs when cells stop behaving as they are supposed to. Your body is made by something like 200 different kinds of cells (epithelial cells, neuronal cells, blood cells and so on) working together to maintain the body's functions. If many of those cells stop doing what they are ...



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