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TL;DR - ask someone who has survived 45 years after treatment of their testicular cancer. The patient (and most doctors) would consider that a cure. I believe the kxcd cartoon explains prognosis quite well. There is something that @Crags has overlooked, though, and that is the caveat "Once most cancers spread out into your body, they're incurable". I ...


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The term tumor is used in the medical definition of inflammation. However it just denotes a temporary swelling that goes down once the inflammation subsides. This swelling is due to edema (accumulation of fluid). You have to understand that in practice no one uses the term tumor to denote an inflammatory swelling. So the term “tumor” denoting edematous ...


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Replicated from comment section: "Tumor," latin root Tumere is for swelling. If you're looking at a modern definition though, you have to consider the abnormal tissue growth. Yes, injuries may produce a thrombus, embolus, etc. however when you get injured and it swells, that isn't really a tumor. Injury swelling is just a biochemical response, but isn't ...


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The HeLa cell line is undoubtedly the most used and investigated human immortal tumor cell line. Extracted from a cervical tumor from Henrietta Lacks in 1951 at Johns Hopkins hospital, Baltimore, MD these cells proved immortal and are still used in many, many labs worldwide today. It is the oldest human cell line in use and, therefore, the oldest human ...


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Tl;dr answer, tumors are abnormal growth (or swelling, thanks to Malic for pointing out) of any kind. The kinds of tumors are benign and malignant. Benign tumors are usually slow growing and harmless. Example would be a lipoma. Malignant tumors are otherwise called cancers. They generally have a bad prognosis. Very few cancers are curable. Swelling ...


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Tumor cells can have very unstable genomes, as much of the error repair machinery is damaged or missing. Since the cells are rapidly dividing and the DNA gets duplicated each time a cell splits, more and more mutations accumulate as the tumor grows and metastasizes. Just like in evolution as a whole, mutations that are either neutral or help the cell survive ...


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A tumour is simply a space-occupying lesion (something that should not be there, that is; a "lump") caused by abnormal cell replication. (In medicine, the word "tumour" literally means "swelling", and can sometimes refer to that instead, but that's a different story). Cancer is a disease in which cell replication is totally out of control. What causes ...


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Cancer is commonly defined as uninhibited cellular replication caused by mutations to the genome. Genes where cancer-causing mutations have been identified are known as oncogenes; the COSMIC (Catalogue Of Somatic Mutations In Cancer) database lists all of the known oncogenes (547 to date - 23rd Jan 2015 - 1% of all human genes!) [1]. The effect of a ...


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In some cases yes — when there is a mutation in apoptotic regulators such as Bcl2 family of proteins. In other cases it is difficult to identify and only identification is that those cells are growing rapidly; in other words failure to undergo apoptosis is not the cause but the effect of the cancerous transformation (as in case of p53, Ras, Myc mutations ...


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Tumors can be benign (they don't bother you at all eg: a mole which does not change) and malignant (also called cancer). The difference is based on:- Degree of differentiation - How much the tumor cells resemble the normal cells Rate of growth - In general (over generalised) benign tumors are slow growing while malignant tumors are fast growing Spread to ...



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