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I can't fault @WYSIWYG for mentioning the cited Vogelstein article in providing an answer. You point to what seems like a great explanation for why certain cancers arise in some tissues but not others. However, for those who look closely this paper has some serious errors in its derivation of the model, and for good reason it has come under strong fire in ...


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There are a number of ways to screen for mutator genes. One straightforward approach in bacteria is to take an antibiotic sensitive non-mutator strain, grow it up, and expose to different antibiotics. Cells that survive in the presence of multiple antibiotics have acquired multiple de novo resistance mutations and thus are highly enriched for mutator ...


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You should have a look at this interesting article published earlier this year in Science. There are two mechanisms by which cells can accumulate mutations in DNA: Replication errors External physicochemical agents such as UV, carcinogens etc In the abovementioned paper, the authors classify cancers into two types: That arise predominantly because of ...


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Hallmarks of Cancer: The Next Generation is by far my favorite article at the moment explaining cancer in-depth. I'd recommend reading through it. The cells replicate themselves, without regard for normal cellular restriction, due to a number of mutations that accumulate: So our cancer cells are evading apoptosis. P53 might be knocked down, so cell cycle ...


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I would do this through the Reactome database. Searching for "AKT Signalling" returns, among other things, an entry for PI3K/AKT Signaling in Cancer (Homo sapiens) (REACT_147723). Clicking on that link will take you to the pathway's page, and if you click on "Disease" (under "Locations in the PathwayBrowser"), you will be shown a link to the pathway browser ...


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The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a tool called "Quick GO", which allows you to search the Gene Ontology (GO) database using specific pathways or terms. In the "Annotation Download" section (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/QuickGO/GAnnotation) enter your search term (e.g. "AKT signalling") and "search". QuickGO will present you with the search results, ...



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