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What you're asking is essentially to prove a negative ("Are there no ways an unchecked cancer can be non-lethal?"), which is unfortunately more of an exercise in imagination than anything else. The best way I can answer is by highlighting what about cancer actually kills, from which you can personally evaluate if a particular type of cancer fits and would be ...


5

Short answer The distinction between Gram positive (Gram+) and negative bacteria (Gram-) has absolutely nothing to do with membrane potentials; it is all about the Gram staining procedure. Background The Gram staining was named after the Danish bacteriologist Hans Christian Gram, who originally devised it in 1882 (Gram, 1884). Gram staining is a common ...


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Bacteria or other microorganisms cannot really grow on anhydrous (totally dry) glucose because they need water. However, they can remain there and cause contamination. Even if you haven't actually touched the glucose sample, there are many bacteria suspended in the air and they may settle down in your glucose packet. When you take the glucose out for ...


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In most cases, it's not a good idea to replace glucose with glycerol in animal cell media. Animals do possess the ability to metabolize glycerol, via a pathway starting with the enzyme glycerol kinase. However, glycerol kinase is only expressed in certain cell types, such as liver cells and kidney cells. References: ...


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Ribosome assembly starts in the nucleolus (of eukaryotes) and finishes in the cytoplasm. However, in the cytoplasm the Golgi apparatus is certainly not involved, and, as some cells have little rough endoplasmic reticulum, assembly does not require that. Thus, the abstract of a review by Fromont-Racine et al. in Gene (2003) vol 313 pp. 17–42 starts with the ...


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Your question spans two activities of T-cells that are related to each other: migration and activation. T-cells that usually stay in lymphoid organs migrate to non-lymphoid organs with different mechanisms for each T-cell subtype. When migrated to non-lymphoid organ, the T-cells move through the organ looking for infected cells. Migration As you can see in ...


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I can't tell if you're asking about glassware or work surfaces (hoods, benches etc), but... We use regular old dawn dish soap in my lab because what's more important than the soap you use to wash you're glassware is the water you use to rinse it. We teach our undergrads the 3-rinse-rule. After soaping, every item gets 3 rinses with normal tapwater (or ...


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The protein doesn't move towards anything. It just randomly diffuses (bounces around) in the cell until it sticks to something. The particular chemical structure (the shape) of the protein and whatever it hits will determine how tightly they stick together and whether or not a chemical reaction occurs. A way to imagine this is to think of a jar filled with ...


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‘Reversible’ and ‘Irreversible’ are standard designations in enzyme kinetics. It may be that your instructor was using the word in this sense. As already commented, irreversible inhibitors bind the enzyme in such a way that they don't dissociate from it. Either they form a covalent bond or their affinity for the binding site is extremely high. Reversible ...


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If you are looking for a hard and fast answer, there is none. Life does not have a hard and fast definition, so it is impossible to identify something that everyone will recognize as both living and non-cellular. However, your question is answerable if you are interested in a summary of the state of the debate. All living organisms are made up of one ...


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The following is not an answer to the original question: "Are Gram negative bacteria classified as such because of their negative membrane potential?" but to the questions later in the text. Usually the membrane potential is given for the inner cytosolic part and the extracellular space, for E. Coli it is around -120 mV; see also this article. Due to the ...



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