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So, to go through the question in total: (a) Part A nucleus is correct, but Part B ist the cytosol/cytoplasm, as the line does not stop at the border, but goes through it and ends in the gray part of the cell. (b) For part C, it is the same problem as in your first question. Yes, the picture may be a plant cell, however, upon this drawing one cannot ...


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From a picture like this one cannot actually say whether "part-A" is a mitochondria or chloroplast. That could even be some random vesicles or, to think even crazier, assembling viruses. The question is really bad and the kid isn't really incorrect. Mitochondria as a guess is pretty reasonable too. However, the second answer is incorrect. I don't know what ...


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As explained in the previous answer, the RBC loses its nucleus only at maturity. The nucleus contains the DNA and which can in turn produce protein. No nucleus means - no protein/ mRNA synthesis. Also, obviously, the cell loses its capability to divide. Hemoglobin too is a protein. Knowing that it would lose its nucleus, hemoglobin is synthesized in the ...


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I'm unaware of such stop occurring at a mitotic prophase, but if your definition of "cell division" includes meiosis, the answer is yes: in several species, the oocyte stops at the first prophase (prophase I), in a resting phase called "dictyotene": https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dictyate


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The missing science to the question is the failure to realize that water inside a cell is bound to hydrophilic proteins which form an exclusion zone. This EZ is well described in the literature by Pollack. The EZ carries a strong net negative charge and it excludes protons. This has also been confirmed by numerous researchers across the world. The ...


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During cell-division centrioles move towards opposite 'poles' and finally get attached to cell-membrane. Different factors influence & drives this process, most still not discovered. So this mechanism is largely unknown. From the scientific literatures published on this matter till recently we can say that this process should include, 1. A structure ...


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In many cases the chromosomes do undergo some dispersion, they do not reach the extremely extended state of the interphase nucleus, this all happens in telophase -1. It would be correct to refer to the stage between two meiotic divisions as interkinesis which is generally short lived. The prophase-2 is initiated immediately after cytokinesis, usually ...


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If you are lucky and live in a university town with student shops, which are run by student organizations, I would recommend you to visit one of those shops. Often they sell used microscopes, which are no longer needed. If you do not mind that these microscopes have been used before, you will get a much better quality for less money. If you go to such a ...


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The problem is that for most sequencing operations you nowadays still need more than one cell - even though this will change soon. Accordingly, you have to sample cells from a tissue which often, if not usually, contains more than one cell type, see e.g. this picture from a lung tissue from the Wikipedia article on tissues linked above: It is not ...


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So there are a couple of things you should ask yourself: a) how 'small' do you want to see b) what are you trying to study - (microspores can differ depending on that. Examples: Microbiology - (bacteriology), Plant biology...) 200 dollars for a 'proper prof. microscope'I do not think is enough. However I do not think that is what you are looking for (For ...


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There are optimal temperature, pressure and substrate concentration for each biochemical process. The optimal temperature and pressure for two or more (but not all) processes may overlap. So there is no SINGLE temperature or pressur where ALL of them will be at their maximum. Please note, by mentioning "cellular processes" I meant all the biochemical(e.g ...


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A chromosome is simply a length or segment of DNA. Bacteria have few structural proteins on their DNA, and they have one circular chromosome. In humans, before DNA replication, the nucleus contains 46 strands of DNA, i.e. chromosomes (22 chromosomes in two copies and usually two X or one X and one Y for males and females, respectively). All chromosomes are ...


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There are two parts to answer this question. "How does my body know when to pee? Do diuretics affect that, or my hydration?" Does wanting to pee imply dehydration? In summary: Not necessarily. Your body might have plenty of water, but the bladder is full. Alternatively your body might be dehydrated, but the caffeine and normal body functions have ...


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According to David H. Vroon and Zafar Israili aminotransferases (transaminases) are widely distributed among tissues, and are found in both cytoplasm and mitochondria, although this may vary between different aminotransferases: Aminotransferases catalyze the redistribution of nitrogen between amino acids and corresponding oxoacids participating in both ...


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The oxidative deamination takes place inside the mitochondria, because the glutamate dehydrogenase is localized in the mitochondria. About the transamination, I'm not sure if it occur inside the mitochondria or in the cytoplasm. The information about the oxidative damination and the enzyme could be found at this link: http://www.bioinfo.org.cn/book/...


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(Not an evolutionary biologist, but I couldn't resist :) I don't think your premise is correct. In (symmetric) cell division, we should consider that the old cell "disappears" and two new cells appear; neither of the two daughter cells is the parent cell, they are both descendants of it (hence the term "daughter cells"). The parent cell is gone. Therefore, ...



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