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Welcome to BioSE! As @Chris mentioned, transported atoms and molecules don't typically retain a record of their past history, so just by looking at a molecule in the cell you can't in general tell how it arrived in the cell (an exception might be proteins that have some chemical modification on them that allows them to be imported via a specific mechanism, ...


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but with machines its easy. It's not that easy...the Turing machine can't interpret the tape without knowing something about what the 1s and 0's mean. A complied C++ program is gibberish if read through a Perl interpreter. DNA isn't as abstract as that, anyway. A DNA molecule interacts with other molecules based on its shape, which the sequence of ...


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The central dogma of molecular biology states that DNA encodes the information for building proteins, the information is copied to messenger RNA through transcription, and messenger RNA is used to build proteins through translation. DNA is also copied through replication. So while it's true that DNA contains the information needed to build a living ...


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You may want to look into "Evolutionary - Developmental Biology", which deals with how an embryo develops into a grown organism. Thus, by combinatorial specifying the identity of particular body regions, Hox genes determine where limbs and other body segments will grow in a developing embryo or larva. A paragon of a toolbox gene is Pax6/eyeless, ...


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Flagella in prokaryotets is very different from that of eukaryotes. The main structural protein in a prokaryotic flagellum is flagellin. The flagellar motion is caused by a molecular motor similar to Mitochondrial ATP-synthase; molecular motion generated by the chemiosmotic energy. Eukaryotic flagella or cilia are made of microtubules with dynein attached ...



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