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As you note, "Monera" includes both Bacteria and Archaea -- but genetic analysis and molecular comparisons reveal without a shadow of a doubt that Archaea share a more recent common ancestor with Eukaryota than they do with Bacteria. Consequently, "Monera" is a paraphyletic group, not a proper taxonomic category. Thus the term has been abandoned in favor of ...


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I'm surprised this term shows up much anymore. Though it's a part of history now, the following paper by Woese demonstrated the three domain system long ago. This, however, is the net result of the sequenced genomes of eukaryotes, archaea and bacteria: Source: Toward automatic reconstruction of a highly resolved tree of life. The phylogenetic ...


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Yes there is a difference in the number of phospholipid molecules because of the curvature. This is very evident when there is a lot of bending as in case of exocytosis (see here) but otherwise I do not think there would be an enormous difference in the number of phospholipids between inner and outer surface of the bilayer. Assumptions: Cell is spherical ...


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Sort of problematic is the "at a whim" part. Just a brief search to wikipedia on electric organs, here, we see that the electrocytes are controlled by a nucleus of pacemaker neurons. This is all unique to electric fish, and you'd have to express that whole system in a human being to elicit the same effect. You'd also have to consider how your organism is ...


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Genetic modification of any cell to overexpress a fluorescent protein will not 'generate' light, per-say: fluorophores absorb particular wavelengths and re-emit in less energetic wavelengths, dispersing some energy as heat. (Perhaps there is some semantic choice here, but there is no transduction to light from another form of energy.) Bio-luminescence, on ...


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Yes, the fibroblasts of skin cells can quite easily be Transfected with a fluorescent gene such as GFP. Fluorescence doesn't actually produce light, the fluorescent molecule just changes the wavelength of light shining on it. Fibroblasts can also be made luminescent (light producing) by acquiring genes for firefly luciferase or aquoren from jellyfish. ...



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