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This answer doesn't add anything to the others, but is an attempt to explain using different language. "my question is why the water of cytosol doesn't dissolve the ionic part of the lipid bilayer" In a sense, it does. See my diagram below The bilayer is composed of phospholipids, classic amphiphiles with a polar head group and a nonpolar tail group. The ...


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ADDENDUM Water can disrupt the intramolecular hydrogen bonds by bonding to the donors/acceptors. However, water in many cases can also act like a bridge and stabilize the protein structures. As already pointed out by jarlemag, the hydrophobic residues can push the water out of the pockets where intramolecular hydrogen bonds are to be formed. You may notice ...


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The main difference is that memory B cells start an immune reaction much more effective and faster than naive B cells. The reaction is also specific towards the antigen. The memory B cell has a specific membrane receptor for an antigen. It produces specific antibodies only when exposed to the antigen. From http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12517929 ...


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Many cell components are not simply hydrophobic or hydrophilic, but have dual affinities. Proteins typically have structures which result in the interior of the protein being hydrophobic and the exterior, which is exposed to the water in the cytosol, being hydrophilic. Thus, differences in polarity between different regions allow proteins to be dissolved in ...


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MitoSOX looks pretty cool. I've never used it myself, but I'm sure you could see some cool mitochondrial dynamics going on. Its a bit pricey though, but all dyes are going to be. Even at only 8 hours you should probably be able to see a few divisions, which would be cool with hoechst.



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