New answers tagged

2

Your understanding of DNA is correct. DNA is a heteropolymer of monomers called nucleotides and each nucleotide is made up of a sugar (deoxyribose), phosphate and a "base" (A, T, G, C). As you already know, DNA is organized as a double helix with the Watson-Crick pairing rules. A chromosome contains a single DNA double helix. Many organisms have multiple ...


0

This problem has been finally solved with help from prof. Kai Tan. It occurred that his lab has been moved from University of Iowa to Children's Hopspital of Philadelphia, so has been this service. Now, the working link is: http://4dgenome.research.chop.edu


5

Your first picture shows a chromosome that has been (1) condensed and (2) undergone DNA replication. During G1 interphase (normal cell activity; not dividing), your chromosomes actually do not look like either of the pictures. They look more like a mass of noodles (called chromatin; look at the image provided below); it is only during prophase (step 1 of ...


1

The first picture you posted represent a pair of chromosomes. The second one represent a single chromosome. Humans have 46 single chromosomes that can be paired in 23 pairs. In this picture, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromosome#/media/File:NHGRI_human_male_karyotype.png, you can see the 46 human chromosomes grouped in 23 pairs. Note that the last pair is ...


-2

When a cell isn't dividing , the DNA is decondensed. So, you can't say what type of chromosomes are present in non-dividing human cells. But just to clarify ; it can be said if a human cell's DNA condenses into chromosome(without replication) , it will look like 46 chromosomes of image 2. If it condenses after replication, it will look like 46 chromosomes ...


-3

46 double structures during cell division. Both your images are chromosomes. Around the beginning of Prophase(cell division) the 2 sister chromatids are distinct.


1

Yes, each single chromosome came from one parent. However, it is not true that each chromosome came from one grandparent. Due to crossing over in meiosis, the copy of Chr 1 that you got from your father is partially from his father, and partially from his mother. And the same for all the rest of your chromosomes. You will not pass on a whole chromosome ...


1

No homologous chromosomes do not imply that each cell has genetic information from only one parent. Let's just talk about one chromosome - and call it Chr1. This chromosome has genes A, B, C, D, and E. When an egg is fertilized by a sperm, the resulting egg will have a pair of Chr1. One of the Chr1 would have come from the mother (egg) and the other from ...


1

The "X" you see is a chromosome. The two strands that forms the X-shaped chromosome are called chromatids. As they are bound together (by the centromer), they are called sister chromatids. Note that chromosomes look like that only during the metaphase. Note also, that not all chromosomes have a centromer that is in the middle of the chromosome as it is ...



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