New answers tagged

1

It's interesting that not only the leader 19, but also 16 and 17 follow a similar trend. Perhaps their size could be the best weight/length proportion to ensure a safe replication? Then what would have to be explained would be 18, so far to the left. That could be if 18 is newer, resulting from the split of a larger chromosome or the fusion of two smaller, ...


4

This Nature paper from 2004, by Jane Grimwood et al. goes at least a long way towards giving an answer to the question of the OP. In short: there were inordinately many duplications, especially during an event 30-40 million years ago, as well as during a much more recent event. These duplications are, uncharacteristically, predominantly intra-chromosomal ...


0

Imagine that mom's chromosome is blue, and dad's is red. If crossing over was happening hundreds of times per chromosome, sure, you could make chromosomes to pass into gametes which were very a very highly shuffled combination of paternal and maternal alleles. It would be blue, red, blue red, blue, red, all up and down the chromosome. But it doesn't. It ...


0

Is this double stranded property the same as saying an organism is diploid? No. You are a diploid organism because you have two copies of every chromosome.* You got one from your mother, and one from your father. All your cells are also diploid, except for your gametes, each of which contains only one copy of every chromosome (due to crossing over, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included