Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Practically, there is an obvious barrier to changes in chromosome number: haploid cells produced by diploids must contain exactly one copy of each chromosome (or chromosome section, or locus). Otherwise over- or under- expression of genes can lead to dosage problems. Across all of diploids some large groups show strong conservation of number of chromosomes ...


3

So, the very first map of the human genome was of a few pooled samples with a single nucleotide called at each position. This is basically okay, though, because humans are 99.9 (with possibly a few more 9s) % similar to one another. So you can get a lot of broadly-applicable information out of a single individual's DNA. Further genome-mapping efforts ...


7

It is already mentioned by canadianer that genome size differs between organisms. But what about complexity? First we should define what complexity is: complexity can be defined as number of different cell types that a multicellular organism can produce, with the same genome. Yes complexity does not correlate with genome size. However, it seems to correlate ...


25

Chart of C-values (the mass of DNA in a single haploid cell); there is no logical order to the groups: [source] Base pairs in haploid genome (some examples): Escherichia coli (bacteria): ~4.5 million Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode worm): ~100 million Humans (we all know what these are): ~3 billion Pinus taeda (coniferous tree): ~22 billion ...


2

I can show the facts here. Human: total length: about 3,000,000,000 coding genes: about 50,000 (included predicted ones) 3,000,000,000/50,000=60,000 Chromosome number: 23 Zebrafish: total length: about 1,400,000,000 coding genes: about 36,000 (included predicted ones) 1,400,000,000/36,000=38,889 Chromosome number: 25 Fruitfly: total length: ...


9

There is both an upper and lower limit which are species specific. The upper limit is caused by incomplete segregation of sister chromatids and subsequent trimming of the long arm(s). The reason for the lower limit is, as far as I can tell, unknown. Upper Limit Schubert I, Oud JL. 1997. There is an Upper Limit of Chromosome Size for Normal Development of ...



Top 50 recent answers are included