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1

You can use differences in coverage (number of reads mapping to certain regions in reference) to infer if there is a B chromosome.


1

You understand, it's not that chimps have lots of extra DNA that humans do not, they have two chromosomes which are fused in humans. Theoretically, discrepancies between the reads and the reference could be discovered. Practically, with current short read technology, it would be difficult to sort out a discrepancy that involved a region of the genome that ...


0

My point in stating what is below is to emphasize even when polyploidy is present in closely related species there is a question of why an organism can survive one ploidy event but not another and why tolerance of polyploidy varies among similar organisms? Several species of deciduous azaleas are tetraploid. Closely related diploid deciduous azaleas are ...


1

What Biomed_guy says is basically the answer, I just wanted to clarify a bit. When you sequence DNA, you do something during the preparation of your DNA library to turn it into small fragments if it isn't already, like shearing the DNA. This gives you very small pieces of DNA that should still be quite unique when matched to reference genome. But as ...


1

I'm pretty sure that it relies on a reference genome. As in, since the original human genome sequencing, most of the techniques used today rely on that original construction (with modifications). That's how people use it to detect copy number variations (CNVs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with these sequencing techniques (and aneuploidy as ...


0

While all the answers above are correct and insightful for the process of DSBs formation, recombination has another layer of complexity. Mediating proper chromosomal segregation is more likely the real point of crossovers since crossovers still happen in inbred genomes, which do not result in novel haplotypes. CO create a heteroduplex structure between DNA ...


4

Those are the break points of the inversion. So chromosome 4 was cut at p13 and q22 and the fragment was reinserted in the reverse direction, giving a pericentric inversion.


3

No they are not. High gene density is correlated with GC content. Most genes are found in GC rich isochores, which are not distributed uniformly (as can be seen on any karyotype). It is also shown through direct sequence analysis (gene density shown in red, GC content in green): Venter et al. go on to say: This inhomogeneity, the net result of ...



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