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9

Yes, it can, but it is extremely rare. ... nosebleeds are rarely fatal, accounting for only 4 of the 2.4 million deaths in the U.S. in 1999 [1]. The main issue is that epistaxis can be a sign of potentially fatal diseases: The instances in which nosebleed is potentially fatal are those in which there is a history of recent head injury, severe ...


5

Any injury, that results in external bleeding can lead to death, since it is a breach in the body's defenses and an entry point for pathogens. Explanation: When you have nose bleeding the blood must be coming from somewhere. Usually from inside your body. That means there is a hole in your body which is big enough for blood to stream out. That in return ...


5

You will be hard-pressed to find any scientific data on this question. Psychology in humans is already a difficult study, at times failing to demonstrate results with real scientific rigor. When studying animal psychology, you face another substantial barrier - language. Although some primates have been taught to communicate with sign language, the best of ...


5

Although both involve DNA fragmentation, the pattern produced is very different. During apoptosis, DNA fragmentation is done in a regular, controlled pattern, which if run on a gel produces a characteristic "ladder" pattern. Necrosis, on the other hand, is a more stochastic process, and will produce a smear. This details the difference rather nicely, ...


5

One other important event that can kill the person is that the atmospheric pressure on Mars surface is less than one percent that of earth at ground level. Suddden exposure to extremely low atmospheric pressure will immediately release dissloved gases within blood and and other body fluids as bubbles and the individual is likely to get a very severe form of ...


4

Long story short, the astronaut probably wouldn't make it, and would first loose consciousness then suffocate. There is a lot of myth and hollywood dramatization regarding this kind of thing. Here are some: You will explode. This is just ridiculous. The skin is air tight (relatively speaking). It is also very elastic and can pull and bend quite a great ...


3

There are multiple levels of memory, some of which would die immediately, some of which would take some time. So the answer is: it depends; some immediately, some only very slowly. At the highest level, the current neuronal firing state of the brain encodes memory on a very short scale - working memory. The memory held on this level does not have a clear ...


3

Yes. Usually only in the case of someone with hemophilia (no blood clotting) but it could theoretically occur with any serious uncontrolled nosebleed. Since blood in the stomach tends to cause vomiting, you could also lead to a scenario where someone who was uncomfortable with blood would pass out due to being scared of the blood and then aspirate (puke and ...


3

For car crashes, it's a mixed bag: Better Better Worse Worse Basically, it looks like, if wearing a seat belt, slightly overweight is more likely to survive a car crash, but if no seat belts are worn they are at a disadvantage; the very obese are always more likely to die, however. Also, some of this was found only for males, not females.


2

Yes it can but it is very rare. Most often when you get a nosebleed it is either a vein or capillary that ruptures. However in some cases it is arterial bleeding which is always an emergency. I have honestly noticed when I have nosebleeds often each one is worse than the previous with some having a lot of bleeding but still no gushing from an artery. ...


2

I very much doubt it. You may however die from whatever's causing the pain. The reason you feel pain is so you stop doing whatever is causing the pain. Hence someone knows not to touch a hot fire because it is painful. But the pain itself is not actually the danger - it's the fire burning away skin. So pain is actually a good thing, a survival mechanism. So ...


2

According to Wikipedia Electric shock, the Magnitude of electric shock to a body is mainly due to current as well as voltage. Various factor of the environment will also play a major role in damaging the body while under contact. The following quote explains it: The minimum current a human can feel depends on the current type (AC or DC) and frequency. A ...


2

The issue I suspect you are struggling with is the anthropomorphization of the evolutionary process. Evolution is an optimization process driven by random mechanisms...i.e. there is often not a "reason" for why certain things are the way they are. Evolution is not a conscious "designer" that produces things with a specific goal in mind...it simply "picks" ...


1

Dimethyltryptamine have been identified as normal constituents of human blood, urine,cerebrospinal fluid.Dimethyltryptamine is an N-methylated indoleamine derivative, a serotonergic hallucinogen.It apparently acts as an agonist at some types of serotonin receptors and an antagonist at others.DMT is traditionally associated with indigenous Amazonian people, ...


1

Once the thermodynamically irreversible processes we call brain-death have occurred both memories and the machinery to retrieve them are lost. This is not an answer but a cavil with the premise of the question. Challenges that do not destroy the brain itself are different from those that do. In particular there may be a big difference between hypoxia ...


1

Perhaps the best type of study to examine the role of genes (DNA) in human aging are twin studies. They have either: the same DNA (monozygotic, one egg, "identical" twins (MZ) ) or similar DNA (dizygotic twins, two eggs (DZ) ) and are perhaps exposed the same, or different environments. I won't repeat the information in the link, above, but studies of ...


1

This article deals with the issue in detail.


1

1 year and 17 days only on water and electrolytes. Actually, he went water only for about 75 days (read that elsewhere, can't remember) and then they supplemented his water only diet with electrolytes. He's done it under medical supervision and gained 7 KG in 5 years after the fast. So the weight does stay off (obviously, if you go and stay into a healthier ...


1

You can remember this easily as the rule of threes: You can survive: 3 minutes without air. (death by asphyxiation) 3 hours without shelter (death by hypothermia, heatstroke). 3 days without water. (death by dehydration) 3 weeks without food. (death by starvation) Going beyond those guidelines will generally do you permanent damage. Further reading: ...



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