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4

Yes. Moreover, even if they were not urinating at the time of death, they likely would at death, assuming adequate filling of the urinary bladder. There are two sphincters that close off the urethra. One is under control of the autonomic nervous system and the other is voluntarily controlled (somatic). At death, both sphincters will relax, releasing the ...


2

The WHO has data from 2002 where they classified cause of death. I have treated the following as natural causes: Cardiovascular disease (29.34%) Infectious & Parasitic disease (23.04%) Cancers (12.49%) Respiratory disease (6.49%) Perinatal conditions (4.32%) Digestive disease (3.45%) Neuropsychiatric disorders (1.95%) Diabetes (1.73%) Genitourinary ...


2

There are species where cells and even whole organisms can go into a state called cryptobiosis where their metabolism is suspended but can be revived later. This usually happens when the conditions become too bad for survival (dry/cold etc.) and is reversed once the conditions improve again (rehydration warming up). One prominent and fascinating example are ...


1

Stretching the limits of what is known a bit, there is an interesting example of a phage (virus that infects bacteria) infecting a photosynthetic bacterium in the ocean that deserves mentioning. What is amazing here is that the phage has certain genes that are required for photosynthesis within its genome. Why does it have these? The phage extends the ...


7

Note: This answer is a complement to @Christiaan's answer, and is partly reusing stuff from this related answer. Since you are specifically asking about viruses, I thought that it might be interesting to mention that similar behaviour changes as those mentioned for fungi can also be caused by viruses. See e.g. this quote from Roy et al. (2006): In ...


49

You must tell facts from fiction; viruses need living cells to replicate, because they do not have the molecular machinery at hand to generate energy and construct building blocks essential to life. So no, viruses cannot bring back the dead or revitalize dead cells. The thing that comes close to it are zombie ants. These ants have been infected by a ...


-2

In my opinion smell could have an impact on why we buried the dead but I also theorize we did this so our family members or friends would not get eaten by a scavanging animal. I would assume being eaten was a constant worry while alive and probably a fear among early man to be eaten after death. That's just my theory though.



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