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1

I don't know, which technique you worked on, but there are the so-called 'Next Generation Sequencing' methods. I think the oldest of that is a pyrosequencing technique called 454 sequencing (I think it is provided by Roche). However, this method is too expensive compared to even newer methods and the support will be stopped within the next months, as far as ...


0

As you correctly discerned, distinguishing the fetal cell free DNA from the mothers cell free DNA in the blood stream is one of the major challenges in this type of diagnostics. Consequently, the results that can be directly linked to the paternal DNA are the most reliable. In the case of the example you give, the high accuracy stems from the fact that in ...


3

I am not aware of any websites that provide full DNA sequences for food products specifically. In the context of your question, by "food samples" I am assuming you are chiefly referring to meat, fish, and dairy products (the headline-making categories of food fraud), although similar principles are applied to plant products, oils, rice, and other natural ...


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The attached figure shows the Illumina reads coverage for two 0B, two 1B and one 2B samples. Note that the figure shows a specific genomic regions with a higher reads coverage for the 1B and 2B samples compared to the 0B ones.


2

Reliable sequencing reads start usually 50bp downstream from start of primers. Which means that 180bp-band (on the gel) sequenced with one primer will yield readable sequence in region 50-180bp (130bp length). Also I notice that sequences usually reported somewhat before reliable data, i.e. clean data starts after 52-55bp, but sequencing reports basepairs ...



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