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Comparing back to related DNA is how it has been done in the past with the woolly mammoth. So it might be a mater of extracting enough and finding close enough relatives to do this. But from what I have read, the DNA is so heavily fragmented that is is relatively impossible to map even to close relatives. You can understand this as the more heavily ...


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The traces you have come from Sanger sequencing. N in genetics means nucleotide (surprising right?). N is used when the base at a given location is unknown (or could be any base pairs). In your case you have Ns because the base-calling software is unable to determine the nucleotide. The first N is due to two peaks overlapping (G and A signals) and the ...


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So the two Ns that you see are not necessarily variants, but rather likely just poor quality reads. Essentially when you sequence DNA and the sequencer can't make a call as to what the base is, it will just designate it N meaning that the base could be any of the four DNA bases. As for finding the reading from, if you know this sequence contains a stop ...


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The authors of this 2012 review article summarize the problem well in their introduction: In contrast to the tremendous advances in throughput, assembling sequencing reads remains a substantial endeavor, much greater than the sequencing efforts alone would suggest [22-24]. Large complex plant genomes remain a particularly difficult challenge for de novo ...


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So cryopreservation would be the long-term mode of storage, and you'd do something like store your sample in a cryonic freezer supplied w/ liquid nitrogen at -196C. Cellgro provides some recommendations for cryopreservation here. Keep in mind, cryonic freezers are typically pricey, but broady, the idea is you need to keep your cells at the right temperature, ...



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