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The basic steps of ChIP-Seq are: Crosslinking proteins to DNA - this fixes the proteins in their natural positions Nuclease digestion - this removes regions that are unbound to protein; nucleases are sterically hindered from digesting protein-bound DNA Immunoprecipitation - this allows isolation of the target protein by binding it to a selective antibody ...


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So that's not quite how ChIP-Seq (Chromatin ImmunoPrecipitation and Sequencing) works. First, you start out with a large number of cells per sample (preferably on the order of 107 or more - the more sample, the more immunoprecipitations you can do to different targets) and do whatever it is that you're going to do to induce transcription factor binding - ...


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The MIT synthetic chemist Gobind Khorana won the 1968 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work which successfully was able to make chains of Ribonucleic acids. The chemistry was difficult at the time but he won the prize for making specific sequences of RNA bases which were then fed to cells, resulting in specific amino acid chains, which ultimately deciphered ...


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For the classic Sanger sequencing you need quite large amounts of DNA to be able to run the sequence reaction. This is a problem when you want to sequence whole genome since the DNA needs to be amplified then, which for some sequences can cause problems, introduce errors or cause bias. Single molecule sequencing is a huge step forward here, since only one ...


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If it is a good idea to use PacBio depends a lot on what you want to sequence and what you want to do with the data you get. In short: you get longer reads but about 15% error per base. This means, you will have to cope with those errors, there are possibilities to do that. How much coverage you will get of you sample I cannot tell you, as I do not know what ...



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