New answers tagged

2

We will be needing some additional information to answer your question more completely: What sequencing platform are you using? Illumina HiSeq/MySeq; Ion proton What type of sequencing (as noted by @CMosychuk): Exome or Whole Genome? What type of variant caller (as noted by @CMosychuk): Unified Genotyper; Haplotype Caller; TVC The QUAL metric is heavily ...


0

I'll take a stab at this question though some of the comments might have already answered what you're looking for. A human reference genome was created to create a framework through which we can study the human genome. Every human will have differences from this reference and something you'll even find difference within the same person between cells. Using ...


0

I think there are two concepts that you need to understand to understand what "sequence the human genome" mean; within vs between species variation and genome consensus Within vs between species variation There is indeed variation in the human population. We are not clones of each other. One can for example consider the average number of pairwise ...


1

Certainly individuals have unique genomes. The human genome sequencing project used DNA from a handful of volunteers, and the reference human genome that resulted from this project can be thought of as an "average" genome for those individuals. Where sequences differed between the individuals, a representative consensus sequence was chosen. Hence, the ...


0

aI used to work at Affymetrix when most of these arrays were designed. I was not on the design team itself, but I can maybe talk about this a bit more. RNA Array designs were built to cover anything that might possibly be real transcript in the mix of EST collections, cDNA, in silico gene detections and miscellaneous entries in public databases. There ...


1

You should be very careful trying to conclude something from what is known about Neandertal genetics. To answer question 1: NO! This is probably not what he meant. To date, we have only two high-quality full genomes of archaich humans, one being the (Neandertal from Denisova cave, called Altai Neandertal (Prüfer et al., 2014)) and one being the (Denisovan ...


4

Even though I am not sure I understand your question completely, I want to try to explain to you the genetic difference between humans and chimpanzees. I will work through your questions: We share 98.5% genes with chimps ,so there is about one percent difference .It means we can approximately differ from them by one base pair every hundred base pairs on ...



Top 50 recent answers are included