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No, your approach will not work, you are taking a very simplistic view of an extremely complex system. Some of the problems you are ignoring are: Genes (eukaryotic genes anyway) are spliced to produce mRNA, a process that removes introns and leaves only the exons. If you just translate the entire chromosome file you will get noise. Splicing also changes ...


5

During the generation of gametes (sperm, eggs), chromosomes can cross-over - this swaps paternal and maternally-derived genetic material. So none of the descendant's chromosomes would be a direct copy of Einstein's, and furthermore, each offspring receives half of its genetic complement from each parent. This means that if you pool the DNA data from small ...


2

Why bother predicting proteins badly from DNA sequence when you could have just as well downloaded the manually curated human proteome? As to your questions: Are you asking about human genomes or genomes in general? The vast majority of the variance in human genomes is in non-coding sequence. As to genomes in general, they vary in pretty much every ...


2

Entropy is a measure for the number of states accessible to a system. The more states available, the higher the entropy. If you think of an atom confined in a volume V, then, without further restrictions, the atom can be anywhere inside that volume, i.e. the number of states will be a function of the volume V. The bigger the volume, the bigger the entropy. ...


2

Ahh entropy. The bane of many undergraduates. You won't need a lot of mathematical rigor needed to solve for absolute entropies in most biological fields so it's best to think of it abstractly. Consider the atom. What can it do? Well if you remember from chemistry class, it can bounce around a process we call translate, and the electrons can basically ...


1

As this table shows, the more complex a molecule is (in general) the more entropy it has. Entropy is an absolute quantity which is zero at $0^o K.$ When an atom or molecule has no way to rotate (is 'frozen') there is only one state in which it can exist. An atom of a gas or a molecule of a diatomic gas at $25^oC$ is also somewhat constrained compared to a ...


1

Your problem will finally boil down to searching your sequence in the Blast databases. Performing Blast seems to be probably the best way to find out if your bacteria has that specific protein expressed or not. If you could not find it in the nearest species using Blast, then try running PSI-BLAST, which would return you distant homologs, by which you can ...



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