New answers tagged

1

It's not the size that counts, it's how you pack it (sorry couldn't help myself). Wild-type bidensoviruses do a lot of interesting things to pack genome like splitting its genome into two virions(1), inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) that form panhandles that can stack instead of hairpins (2), and overlapping positive and negative ssDNA strand ends (2 and 3) ...


0

Before you consider the development of bilatteral symmetry (which is what you are talking about), you need to look at the overall changes relating to animal body plans. To begin with, sponges (Porifera) completely lack symmetry and came very early in the evolution of animals. Basically, it's a large cluster of growing cells with some differentiation (ie: ...


1

It is right that RNA has small areas of complementary base pairing. You asked whether these parts are double helical. DNA has various types of double-helical conformations. Most popular among them is the B-form, A-form and Z-form. The Watson Crick model is similar to the B-form of DNA. It is right-handed double-helical structure. A-form and Z-form are ...


2

A chromosome is simply a length or segment of DNA. Bacteria have few structural proteins on their DNA, and they have one circular chromosome. In humans, before DNA replication, the nucleus contains 46 strands of DNA, i.e. chromosomes (22 chromosomes in two copies and usually two X or one X and one Y for males and females, respectively). All chromosomes are ...


8

OK, let's set up a specific hypothetical situation so we have some details: A virus (we'll call it Human Nasty Virus 1 (HNV-1)) can infect T cells (a type of white blood cell in the immune system) by binding to a certain receptor on its surface, which we'll call the Nasty Virus Receptor (NVR). Scientists have found that HNV-1 absolutely needs a certain ...


3

Genetic information is the heritable information used by organisms to guide their self-assembly. It's why traits can persist across generations. DNA is, by far, the primary material used (by life) to encode genetic information, but it's not the only one. RNA is a pretty common alternative to DNA. If we're looking to Wikipedia, this is actually referred to (...


0

1) Generally, DNA forms small amount of total mass of eukaryote cells. Apparently, due to large amount of so called "junk DNA" (although this term biased, there are parts of junk DNA that are shown to be useful, albeit directly non-coding, but other parts are shown to be complete junk and even harmful). Thus, eukaryote cells do not generally optimize for low ...


3

This is in between an extended comment and an answer. What do you mean by "Natural"? The question makes no sense as the term "natural" isn't properly defined. (I am voting to close as unclear). For example, if you go to an area where there is "naturally" a high radioactivity, this will increase your mutation rate. Is this a natural way to change your ...



Top 50 recent answers are included