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4

Yes, they do. A blog post on the National Geographic website describes the results of a study about how blind people dream.(1) The participants who were born blind did not report any visual impressions. Among those who previously had sight, the number of visual impressions reported decreased with the time since loss of sight. Just as there are many ways ...


3

Since mammals all share the same neural structures it is quite likely that most non human species dream, but as yet, the simplest animal I could find that has been scientifically demonstrated to dream is the rat, as proven by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). MIT not only established that rat were capable of dreaming about the events they had ...


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Your shown homocysteine pathway is way too simple. Especially the production of the neuromodulator H2S from excess sulfur amino acids is not shown. In the last years many more enzymes and reactions have been discovered. I have summarized human sulfur amino acid metabolism in reactome.org, so please use this link to discover all the details and new papers. ...


2

For those who have access, here's the full text. Having read the paper, I can't give you a good answer. This study was performed in mice, not humans, and "sleep" was achieved in a few ways. Mice normally sleep most of the day, so it was easy to get mice sleeping normally. They also induced "sleep" through anesthesia (incidentally, they saw these same ...


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Recent scientific research suggests that dopaminergic pathways are responsible for dreaming. According to this theory if something affects your dopamine system, it will also affect dreaming. My personal takeaway from this is that your dreaming can be viewed as an indicator of how your dopaminergic system works. Significant deviations from the baseline dream ...


2

The cones and rods would not contain the images from our dreams. Visual scenes get transferred from the eye to the thalamus (which serves as a relay to the cortex) by optical fibers that are overwhelmingly uni-directional (information is carried from the eyes to the thalamus and not vice-versa). Dreams do, however, activate the thalamus, the visual cortex, ...


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Well i will like to contribute a fact which might seem a little bit out of context. R P Feynman, the famous physicist, in his semi-autobiographical book mentioned his experiments with his consciousness and also 'dreams'. He reported that he was actually able to alter his dreams, with a little bit of practice, while he was experiencing them. Well after ...


1

This is a difficult question to answer because we are only aware of basic mechanisms that go on in the brain during dreaming. One theory that is prevalent during sleep is that we may be replaying the day's events in order to extract and store the important information encountered. So if you block sleep after learning you can interfere with it. The function ...


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I have to add that the authors do not show any evidence for cell shrinkage. In fact, the word shrink is not mentioned even once in the article. Therefore the BBC article is not correct. To answer your question, all we know is that there is more fluid clearance; the authors do not show the mechanisms for this.



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