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If a dog is homeless and hungry, any breed would likely kill and eat about any animal smaller than themselves. All carnivorus animals do this in nature, the exception only being if the potential prey is too good at self defense. Just like domestic cats still have instincts for killing birds, mice, snakes and other other small prey, dogs also have these ...


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One example: The Satin Bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus). The males of this species build structures out of sticks (suprisingly called bowers) that they decorate with blue items to attract potential mates. Recent research has shown that the males have began incorporating plastics into these structures for courtship. A google image search can confirm ...


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I can think of an example for the 3rd picture in your image "Common Agent With Multiple Symbiotic Relationships." We have: 1.) a species of parasitoid wasp 2.) a species of plant and 3.) a species of moth. The moth provides pollination activity for the plant. The plant provides a place for the moth to lay its eggs, and a food source for caterpillars once ...


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I think what you are asking for is "Multiple Mutualism". Normally, Most of the known cases of multiple mutualism involve relationships in which two of the partners are at the same organizational level—usually two bacteria that might be interacting directly—but are both essential for the survival of the host — Entente cordiale: Multiple ...


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The human body contains a few billion microbes (more than human cells), so we live in symbiosis with many different species. Some of them protect us from infections, some of them help in the digestion, and so on... So I think the human body fulfills your requirements. wikipedia - human microbiome Normally we don't live in sterile environment. So we ...


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I think part of the confusion is that these terms are very loosely defined. Also this discusses evolution in terms of taxanomic radiation, e.g. macroevolution at large spatial and temporal scales. Problem 1 is that you haven't been clear about what kind of competition, inter or intraspecific competition? These will have opposing effects generally which ...


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I assume that you mean gene expression regulation when you say genetic processes. The best example for your question would be that of synaptic plasticity in neurons. The immediate responses are obviously that of protein modifications (cell signaling). These are fast responses that have immediate effects but are also quite short-lived. During the long term ...


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This potentially depends on what species you are referring to. In the case of plants, photosynthesis is used to as their source of energy, so will never run out of food as such. Assuming the conditions are favourable in terms of water and temperature (likely, otherwise the species wouldn't have flourished in the first place) and they stay that way, the ...


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You need to add Bell curves to your simulation. The most important curve to simulate is the nutritional quality of the prey though there are plenty more thing to curve like speed and virility for prey and predators both. Nature uses lots of Bell curves so they must be good for something, such as softening the harsh effects of pure exponential growth. I ...



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