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Mike Taylor's answer is well-researched and inspired the following thought experiment that might help you. Imagine a predator of the cicada which takes several years to reach maturity(say, five). The population of this predator is distributed evenly across all the different stages of its life cycle, at least at first. One year there is a cicada eruption ...


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New Answer, based on first comment by user2686410 and subsequent edits to the question. I have interpreted "synchronizing their own generations to divisors..." to mean synchronizing the length of the life cycle. I am happy to hear of another interpretation. First, the overall goal of Goles et al. (2001) does not seem to test hypotheses related to the ...


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The methods should be equivalent, given the same data. Using phylosignal's demo: library("picante") library("phytools") set.seed(5) randtree <- rcoal(20) randtraits <- rTraitCont(randtree) phylosignal(randtraits[randtree$tip.label],randtree) phylosig(randtree, randtraits[randtree$tip.label], method="K",test=TRUE) phylosignal returns: K ...


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In nature, species compete for resources like water, light, nutrients, etc. and need to find 'their place' in this struggle. According to niche theory, every species occupies a certain spot in the multidimensional niche space (the dimensions describe the number of environmental factors) where it performs better than any other species. If there would not be ...


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The distribution of temperate hardwood forests, as well as deserts, tundras, savannahs, and other ecosystems, is determined primarily by average climate conditions, specifically average annual temperature and precipitation. You can see how biomes are related to climate in this figure, taken from Whittaker (1975): Temperate forests tend to be between ...


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I think Wallace (1968) developed the ideas of hard and soft selection, as they relate to genetic load. He further explains the concept in Wallace (1975). As the idea was his, I'd go with Wallace's definition over Whitlock's. I haven't had time to watch the Whitlock video to see if they are saying more or less the same thing overall. Consider a hypothetical ...


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Second paper is an article in science Daily and have a pretty decent source from Texas A&M University. It's much better than the first as it is un-sourced post on yahoo answers. Source: "Male Seahorses Are Nature's Mr. Mom, Researchers Say." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 May 2008. Why male seahorses gets pregnant? Genetic answer: May be because only ...



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