New answers tagged

2

Considering your assumption: I'm just looking at the exponential part, where the simple exponential equation works. If we assume there's sufficient nutrients for bacteria to grow unchecked for a number of hours (more-or-less true in a real culture) In your original model you are using discrete states and fixed time steps. So, if 30 min is one ...


1

Real bacteria population will likely reach some carrying capacity that will prevent them to grow exponentially. As a consequence, the exponential model will be a good fit for early growth only but after a while, one will need to use some other model (typically a logistic model). Logistic model Here, I quickly present one standard model of logistic growth ...


0

Dead wood is indeed very important to the food chain, and to the ecology and biodiversity of a forest. Lots of biota depend on the presence of dead wood; many species of insects and fungi only live on dead wood. See for example this study of fungi in Danish Beech forests. The amount of dead wood present depends, apart from management, on the type of forest, ...


32

There are (at least) three important factors to consider here; evolution under selection requires genetic variation upon which to act, selection can act on covarying traits causing trade-offs, and adaptation also occurs in the predator. A lot of this is covered elsewhere on this site (including the effects of the other mechanisms of evolution), but little ...


17

There are two reasons for this: evolutionary trade-offs and coevolution (the "Red Queen hypothesis", as mentioned in the comment above by Luigi). Evolutionary trade-off describes situations where one trait cannot increase without a decrease in one or more others. Some hypothetical examples: longer legs may help run faster but past a certain point will ...


2

Generally speaking, predators will always be faster than prey at a certain given level of biological (or technological) evolution. This, indeed, follows from the obvious observations: Herbivores consume food with low energy density. This means: a. Substantial percentage of their time is spent eating and processing food. b. Substantial fat and water ...


10

There are both costs and benefits to being able to run faster, both as a predator and as a prey animal. In short, maintaining the large muscles necessary to outrun a cheetah every time is metabolically expensive. So it isn't a matter of being able to always outrun a predator--it's a matter of how to optimally allocate precious resources either to ...


1

Predators always have to be much better hunters than the prey - they must eat every few days after all. But they can only get so good. Predator/prey population balance will tend to look like a competition where if the predators are too efficient they will kill off the prey. If that happens they start to starve to death. If the prey outrun the predators ...


1

As the body mass of an organism decreases, their volume decreases exponentially, so their metabolic needs are also reduced. The result is that small organisms like worms and insects have a much larger surface area to body mass ratio, which lets them passively transfer oxygen into their bodies much more easily. I am by no means an entomologist but most ...


1

Perhaps also Habitat. The term typically refers to the zone in which the organism lives and where it can find food, shelter, protection and mates for reproduction...


0

Disclaimed: Not really an answer, but too long for a comment If I understand you correctly, this must depend entirely on the accumulated probablity of detection over the entire detection period (the time the cameras were out). If the accumulated probability of detection across all habitat types is high (approaching 1, given that the animal is present), ...



Top 50 recent answers are included