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1

No, it is not infinite. The sun has not an infinite mass neither does the earth. So energy is not infinite. But we probably don't really care about that as it applies at a scale we're not really concerned with. What is important at our scale is the rate at which is the rate at which the biomass we're destroying (eating, building houses with) is produced. ...


0

Obviously not infinite, since the Earth has a finite mass, and the sun has a finite lifetime. Also the Earth continually loses some (very small) fraction of its atmosphere & water to space, so eventually it would wind up like Mars (which was warmer, wetter, and probably habitable a billion years or so ago).


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Short answer is yes, of course. Maintaining a healthy synapse is very energy-consuming process. Let me first note that forgetting as we know it is more complicated than just pruning of synapses. It might involve rearrangement of proteins in pre/post-synaptic membrane and near it, local de-regulation of local protein synthesis, decrease in synaptic mRNA ...


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I believe your textbook is referring to the fact that you only perform the complete beta oxidation eight times. Because there's a carboxylic acid at the terminus of a fatty acid chain, the cell takes a slightly different route and reacts it with ATP, which generates a fatty acyl adenylate and pyrophosphate (PPi). This AMP can subsequently be displaced in ...


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The electrons for shuttling are mainly generated in the cytosol from glycolysis. NADH can easily pass the outer membrane, but must be shuttled over the inner membrane. It is important to consider that the electrons must be fed to oxidative phosphorylation from the matrix of the mitochondrion, and not the intermembrane space.



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