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1

Don't salinate the lake. It'll be a nightmare to maintain. The 'standard' biocontrol measure is to release 'mosquitofish', but outside their native range they're almost as good at killing native mosquito-eating fish as they are at eating mosquitoes. Find some native fish(perhaps in the bigger lake?) and stock your pond with them. Small fish are probably ...


0

Salitifing the water will terminate larva before developing into mosquitoes.


2

This seems to be a species of the genus Pyrrhocoris, most probably the firebug Pyrrhocoris apterus. Its quite common in Europe, but according to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility there are also some occurrences in the US.


5

It looks like a squash bug to me (Pyrrhocoris apterus). If not apterus, I'd say it is at least in the Pyrrhocoridae family. Note, they must not but confounded with Corizus hyoscyami. Here is a picture of Pyrrhocoris apterus: Pyrrhocoris apterus have a very broad range covering a big part of Eurasia, from France to China. Is it where you found it?


3

That is a European Millipede. I found this picture by searching European Millipede. Obviously there are different types - and this is the one you have. Here is a wiki link I found: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cylindroiulus I think your specifically is a Cylindroiulus britannicus .


1

It could be booklice (Psocoptera), but the picture is a bit unclear. Booklice are harmless, but could indicate moist conditions and/or mold in the building (see first link for more on their biology). Termites are generally at least twice as large as booklice (>4mm), and the size you indice rather points to booklice. Here is an example of what booklice ...


3

What is the purpose of their loud, annoying sound? Both males and females produce a sound when flying but not at the same frequency. I would think of the male sound as mainly an artefact of flying and don't really know if it has any usefulness. I would note though that before mating both gender tend to synchronize their sound (Gibson and Russel 2006). ...


3

This is probably a large yellow underwing not finished pumping up its wings: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Large_yellow_underwing


2

Based on the overall apparence and the distinctive metallic patches on the wings it looks like a moth from the subfamily Plusiinae (Looper moths). I'm not familiar with North American moths, but after a quick check at species found there Megalographa biloba (Bilobed looper moth) seems likely, and this species is also found in California. (picture from ...



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