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0

Here are a few other monarch mimics. It would help if you noted where you saw the butterfly. http://www.geog.ucsb.edu/img/news/2013/Monarch%20mimicry.jpg


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I think this is Gypsy moth caterpiller (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lymantria_dispar_dispar)


1

In the innate immune reponse, pathogens are recognized by a fixed repetoire of cell-surface receptors and soluble effector molecules. These receptors have evolved to recognize pathogens over hundreds of millions of years and provide a formidable defense against a wide range of pathogens. Adaptive immunity has evolved only in vertebrates and complements the ...


4

It is a longhorn beetle (Cerambycidae), most certainly from the subfamily Lamiinae (flat-faced longhorns). The overall apparence with a downward-pointing face, partially divided eyes, robust build and spined pronotum fits well with Lamiinae. The beetle in you picture is very similar to species in the genus Batocera, for instance Batocera rufomaculata ...


5

A good working theory is that this is caused by Rigor Mortis and the anatomy of insect legs. In most cases, the muscles that pull the leg down (or closer together) are larger than the ones that pull the leg up. This is because those muscles (flexors) must support the insect's weight: (Click for larger view) When the muscles contract after death, the ...


5

It is a moth from the Sphingidae family (hawk moths). They are generally large, robust and often have lobed wings (like the one in your pictures). I'm not closely familiar with this group of insects, and not with species found in the UK, but the individual you observed is very similar to e.g. Laothoe populi (Poplar hawk moth), which is also found in the UK. ...


2

I think it's a Robber Fly. Those are predatory.


2

I think that your insect is a White-spotted sawyer. For more information check this: Monochamus scutellatus, commonly known as the white-spotted sawyer or spruce sawyer,is a common wood-boring beetle found throughout North America. Adults are large-bodied and black, with very long antennae; in males, they can be up to twice the body length, but in females ...


4

I think it is from Cerambycidae family, Batocera parryi -


3

As mentioned by InactionPotential, organisms and their parasites are caught in an arms race. When an organism develops a new defense, the parasites with traits that allow them to survive those defenses excel and vice versa. Parasites must balance their survival and reproduction with that of their hosts or go extinct. Over time they may become ...


5

There is not really a definitive explanation for why, although it's important to note that many mammalian pathogens are not adapted to insects and vice-versa. Insects need to survive insect pathogens, and they have a number of defenses for this purpose. Animals and their pathogens co-evolve and exert selection pressures on each other. Killing the host (or ...


0

Since it got bumped and no one seemed to be too clear on an identification. Based on the presence of two recurrent veins in the forewing, following identification guidelines here, I'd identify the above wasp to be a member of Ichneumonidae. The identification of the subfamily, however, is difficult without access to the wasp itself for close observation. ...


1

Good question. I tried to find a few articles to validate my answer, but it would appear that very few professional studies have been done on the matter. One of my hobbies a few years back was ant keeping and I have had several colonies started from queens over the years, so I can share some of my personal experiences. Anyway, back to your question. For the ...


3

The Evaniidae, also known as the ensign wasps or hatchet wasps


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Dusting the area with a diatomaceous earth based insecticide ought to do the trick, while being essentially non-toxic. If you want to prevent plant growth there too then of course salt the earth. See Efficacy of modified diatomaceous earth on different cockroach species (Orthoptera, Blattellidae) and silverfish (Thysanura, Lepismatidae)


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I have a doubt we can answer this question with a high level of accuracy: the sample image is very blurred, it is unclear if there are posterior/lower body elements like forceps as well as other significant features which could help with the identification. My best guess it is baby of Earwig (2000 species): If I look at the posterior part of the body I can ...


6

Yes, it is a skipper (family Hesperiidae) and very similar to European species in Ochlodes, and my guess is that it belongs to one of the North American species in this genus. For instance, it is very similar to Ochlodes sylvanoides (also called Woodland Skipper), which is common in the western parts of the US. However, I'm not familiar with North American ...



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