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0

Maybe this is a late answer, but the difference between an assasing bug (Reduviidae) and a squash bug (or leaf-footed bug, Coreidae) is the structure of the beak. Reduviidae, being predaceous, have relative short, bended beaks, made of three segments and do not go beyond the first pair of legs. Coreidae, herbivores, have a long beak made of four segments. ...


2

Baculoviruses are a a class of viruses which infect only a pretty small number of insects (or their cells in cell culture). To do so, the virus has to infect a cell, take it over to produce the own proteins and DNA to make new virus particles and finally set these new particles free. This is basically what is shown in the image below (from here): From the ...


7

That's an interesting question and not easy to answer. I haven't found data for humans but from experiments with mice. They analysed how the mosquito actually bites, probes for the blood vessels (not all bites are successful) and finally sucks bloods. In their research they observed feeding times between 150 and 329 seconds, depending on the size of the ...


4

As far as I am aware, cockroaches don't burst from being sprayed with soapy water. We previously had many cockroaches in our apartment (some came back after a year of nothing!), and we regularly sprayed the cockroaches with soapy water plus some vineger (more as a disinfectant/cleaner) and they never burst. We've killed at least 30 using this method. Having ...


4

Probably not. An immediate defense against predators requires an immediate response. The sting of Hymenoptera like the wasps and bees has an immediately painful reaction. In addition, in the eusocial (colony-forming) species, multiple individuals typically contribute to defense of their nest. One sting may not deter a predator or invader but dozens or ...


39

A quick search on Web of Science yields "Polyphasic Wake/Sleep Episodes in the Fire Ant, Solenopsis Invicta" (Cassill et al., 2009, @Mike Taylor found an accessable copy here) as one of the first hits. The main points from the abstract: Yes, ants sleep. indicators of deep sleep: ants are non-responsive to contact by other ants and antennae are folded ...


28

The short answer is apparently yes. Studies on sleep in insects date back to papers published by Phil and Nellie Rau in 1916 and 1938. Hussaini et al. (2003) showed that sleep does affect memory formation in honey bees. They showed that retention of extinction learning is significantly reduced in bees that were sleep-deprived. More about sleep in honeybees ...


0

Looks like a variety of the very common and diverse group of "garden" and/or "orb weaver" group(s). They really pop up everywhere during the spring/summer but die off w cold weather (in southeastern US). Like mentioned, they'll bite but not poisonous... They're the guys whose webs you're constantly being freaked out by when u hit it face-first---but then ...


1

I would think this is a European garden spider (or cross spider). See here and here. It can bite humans but it is not dangerous for them.


1

I do not know for certain but one possibility is an internal parasite. A number of parasites have been documented to alter the behavior of the hosts to suit the life cycle needs of the parasite. For example, Toxoplasma is a parasite use rats and cats as hosts. Toxoplasma alters the behavior of the rats so that they no longer respond to the smell of a cat. ...


1

Simply because their body mass is small. It's the same as if an ant falls off from the roof of a building. It will suffer no harm because the speed of its fall will be very slow, but try the same yourself and you will surely die. More scientifically, it's a question of kinetic energy: $E_{kinetic}=\frac{1}{2}\times mv^2$ You can see from this formula that ...


2

This looks like an ant, but I cannot say which species. Their small size, colour, bite and being found indoors made me think of Pharaoh ants (Monomorium pharaonis), but I haven't heard that they smell bad. Ghost ants (Tapinoma melanocephalum) are rather similar and have a foul smell when crushed, and have been found indoors in Europe. They usually have a ...


2

I can't tell you the species but it appears to be a termite. The Australian Museum explains some of the differences between termites and ants. Termites have straight antennae. Ants have bent antennae with a distinct elbow. Your insect has straight antennae without an elbow. Termites have a broad waist. Ants have a very narrow waist. Your insect appears to ...


4

Ants follow odor cues in the wind. A study by Wolf and Wehner (2000) manipulated ant antennae and wind direction to show that ants followed odor plumes on the wind. A more recent study by Buehlmann et al. (2014) showed that desert ants of the genus Cataglyphis cued in on linoleic acid, a so-called necromone (death scent) released by dying insects. Here's a ...


10

Walkingsticks, like that in your photo, belong to the insect order Phasmida (also sometimes called Phasmatodea). The species in your photo belongs to the family Pseudophasmatidae. Texas has two species documented for this family. One is Anisomorpha ferruginea, commonly called the dark walkingstick or northern two-striped walkingstick. The other species is ...



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