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Spiders are naturally attracted to areas where preys are abundant, insects are primary source of spider prey. So you must create proper environment for insects in your home, lights to attract nocturnal insects, flowers to attract butterflies and moths are attracted towards decaying vegetation(It may make your place smelly). Once insects are abundant then ...


2

Simple answer is no: $Ants \neq Aphids$ However, they could be used as evidence that aphids are there depending on the reliability of the coexistence. Ants and aphids are independent entities and do not rely on each other so can exist in non-overlapping populations. Applying this idea to the correct species of ant and aphid is, of course, important for it ...


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No, this is not a carpenter ant...it's possibly a Pavement Ant (Tetramorium caespitum) - only it's a male & hence winged....for identification...follow these guidelines- Pavement ant workers are small, l/8-inch to 3/16-inch long, and blackish brown with light-colored legs and two spines at the end of the thorax. A distinguishing character, ...


3

The actual paper that the linked article cites never mentioned about freezing the crickets: We examined CCR (Chill Coma Recovery) in G. pennsylvanicus exposed to 0 °C. The time required for crickets to recover movement of the abdomen and legs increased exponentially with the duration of exposure to 0 °C; after more than 12 h of cold exposure, ...


2

There are a number of things to clarify here; Fecundity is the number of offspring that is produced by an individual, and this can be separated into potential fecundity (maximum reproductive capacity) and realized fecundity (number of offspring actually produced). Realized fecundity is very similar to fertility, which is defined as the number of viable ...


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In all likelihood, it is your cat who crunches the cockroach's head once it catches it and/or finishes playing with it. Ants do eat bugs but they are usually not so selective that they'll carry off the head alone. With more manageable insects, they carry the whole thing off; otherwise they take it apart and carry it away in pieces if they're interested in ...


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First of all, the beetle you found likely doesn't belong to Trachelophorus giraffa. There are lots of of species in the family Attelabidae, many of them having long necks in males and some were described or are known known from India. I couldn't find any primary source on the nesting behavior of Trachelophorus giraffa, and I suspect that most of the ...


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As the comment by @terdon says, the most likely explanation is that your species identification is mistaken. The superfamily Curculionoidea, which contains the weevils (Curculionidae are the true weevils) is also extremely species rich. Without seeing a picture of what you found, there are many other similar species with long necks in the family Attelabidae, ...


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Honey bees rely on the position of the sun (and the ephemeris function) to navigate and communicate (i.e. the waggle dance). If they are out too late in the day to return to the hive (occasional), or if they are disturbed at night in the hive, they will fly towards a light. Beekeepers and bee renters have learned that if you are going to disturb a hive at ...



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