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26

Given the large eyes, the almost non-existent antennae, the humped back, elongated abdomen and the wings, I'd say it is a robber fly. It is one of many insects known to prey on wasps. Note the description on the linked page: This spindly piece of nastiness is a Robber Fly in the genus Diogmites. It seems that it's members of this particular genus ...


3

Since you suggest they come from a plant, they might be dried aphids. These insects usually feed on plant sap, and I already noticed some tiny, white, and apparently dead ones on plants. As suggested in the comments, these are actually not dead aphids, but only the cuticle they leave after moulting, or ecdysis.


4

It's a cockroach nymph. Unfortunately it's barely visible given the angle of the photo, but it looks like the pronotum (head shield) has a pale margin - which, coupled with the pale markings at the sides of the tergites, makes me think this is a late-instar nymph of the Australian cockroach (Periplaneta australasiae). This looks very similar to the American ...


1

This looks like a nymph of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. The nymphs differ from the adults in that they do not have wings. The egg sac (leftmost object) is approx. 8mm long. (source) (source)


3

It's some sort of potter wasp/mason wasp (Eumeninae). The spiders are paralyzed and brought there as food for its larvae. Here is an example of an opened nest I found on Bugguide.net that looks similar to yours: I don't know if it's possible to say what species it is from the nest.


0

We call it Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Consequences The phenomenon is observed worldwide and is pretty serious. Northern Ireland lost 50% of its beehives for example. Between 1997 and 2003, 10 millions beehives were lost. Many cultivated crops are pollinated by bees and we don't quite have an alternative today. In 2005 a study showed that the worth of ...


2

I didn't watch the game, but from what I've seen on the internet it was the Silver Y (Autographa gamma), drawn there by the lights while migrating http://theconversation.com/moths-expert-match-report-on-ronaldo-insect-encounter-at-euro-2016-final-62314


0

I couldn't really be completely sure by this picture alone so I did some searching around and turns out it is a Autographa Gamma(Silver Y)


0

I am not an electrician and may not be the right person to answer this. But I recently read this paper (Keller et al., 2016) and maybe this helps ... Keller et al. (2016) have a look at laser induced mortality in mosquitoes. It might not be fully adaptable to your needs (there is not much context in your question, though; I have no idea what kind of trap you ...


2

It looks to me like a male Argia fumipennis violacea


3

It is a male Green Darner. Pretty common in general, especially in the US.


0

"Stingers in bees evolved from ovipositors", here is a good reference of how bee stinger have evolved. http://www.askabiologist.org.uk/answers/viewtopic.php?id=4021


0

A honey bee's barbed stinger remains in the skin of any mammal afterwards due to its elasticity (skin closes back around the base after penetration) but can be retracted after stinging another insect. It isn't a human-specific thing. Presumably this is because it takes more toxin to dissuade a mammalian predator than an insect. A little dose of toxin is ...



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