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3

Yes, it is a skipper (family Hesperiidae) and very similar to European species in Ochlodes, and my guess is that it belongs to one of the North American species in this genus. For instance, it is very similar to Ochlodes sylvanoides (also called Woodland Skipper), which is common in the western parts of the US. However, I'm not familiar with North American ...


2

Short answer A low dose of LSD has been shown to lead to larger, more regular webs. This obsessive perfection of the web comes with an increased effort and likely an increased required building time. Whether LSD-affected webs are more effective or not has not been assessed as far as I am aware. Personally I think that, if anything, larger webs are more ...


8

Let's take a look at the magnified body of the insect (it is a nymphe btw) - we can see 2 brown dots one above the other along the body line. This pattern is very suggestive to Chelinidea species (the most common is Chelinidea vittiger aequoris): I stop my search at Coreidae family, because multiple species (a lot of bugs actually) of this family have ...


6

Looks similar to a Rusty Tussock Moth (Orgyia antiqua) caterpillar, but you might want to check the bugguide page for the species, or submit your photo there for a second opinion.


2

The substances that bees consume do end up in honey. There was a high-profile case in Brooklyn in 2010 (The Mystery of the Red Bees of Red Hook) where bees from several hives began producing red honey after feeding on dyed maraschino cherry juice from a local factory. A follow-up article from 2015 (How Bees Revealed a Pot Farm Beneath the Maraschino ...


3

Kaleb Lechowski, creator of that video, is a digital creator and animator of critters. I would propose that he infact did a very good job of rendering a CGI spider to burst from a banana. Spiders (not insects remember) won't eat bananas and in fact only one species is known to be mostly herbivorous: Bagheera kiplingi. However, don't eat that banana just ...


5

Males and females mosquitoes are morphologically quite different. The majority of individuals you see are females. The males are not attracted to humans and so we see them less often. The main obvious difference is the size of the antenna. When you see the large feather-like antennas of a male, you'll have no doubt; it is a male. The male also tend to be ...


0

They could be halictid bees, possibly Agapostemon splendens. Yours looks very similar to this picture (by Bob Peterson) Compare also with this one on bugguide and to the pictures of Agapostemon species in this National Geographic article. Compare the metallic head and thorax (that's the middle segment), the striped abdomen (the last segment), the ...


7

These little creatures look a lot like White-margined Burrowing Bug or Sehirus cinctus nymphs. Very interesting thing about the Sehirus cinctus is their brooding behavior. The female watches the eggs and even feeds the young for a few days. Have a look around. You might see it. AFAIK they don't harm your plants. More info: ...



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