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1

According to Thomas Seeley, in his book, Honeybee Democracy, he gives the following as important criteria for honeybees when selecting a nest site when a bee colony moves to swarm: Larger volume (the minimum nesting capacity was found to be around 14 liters with more preference to nests with a capacity of approximately 30 to less than 100 liters) ...


0

I assume you're talking about keeping honeybees apis mellifera , not other species. Beekeepers often move there hives around to follow nectar availability, so I assume nectar availabilty is considered the most important factor. In my country the first to flower is willow salix. After that they move to cherry&plum tree plantations and after that to ...


1

As the body mass of an organism decreases, their volume decreases exponentially, so their metabolic needs are also reduced. The result is that small organisms like worms and insects have a much larger surface area to body mass ratio, which lets them passively transfer oxygen into their bodies much more easily. I am by no means an entomologist but most ...


2

Firstly, as Remi.b points out, although Trypanosoma brucei infection is invariably fatal in humans, the same is not true for all host species. Domestic animals, particularly cattle, are an important reservoir of T. brucei rhodesiense and can also be infected with T. brucei gambiense (although it's not clear how important a reservoir they are for gambiense). ...


2

What you're talking about is called mechanical transmission (at least in veterinary and medical circles; plant epidemiologists call it something different). There's a nice overview by Gray and Banerjee here, although it's a bit old. The short answer is that blood-feeding insects can mechanically transmit a range of pathogens, including viruses. Mosquitoes ...


0

Chortippus parallelus is a common species in Europe that is according to my grasshopper id-guide extremely variable in color. It can be green, brown, yellow and even purple. I can verify that from field experience. Pink however is much more rare, and considered to be caused by Erythrism See https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erythrism for explanation and ...


2

In short: Yes it should be possible, but probably not for all species and as @anongoodnurse said there are probably easier methods of species-identification. Elaboration: I know (but could not find a reference) that there are currently hyperspectral cameras that are able to capture bandwidths as small as 2 nm. And there are differences in the emission ...


4

Yes, this is possible. The probability has been estimated by Princeton at 1 in 10 million (per bite). It is not against the laws of Physics that blood cells can remain for some time on the proboscis or other mouth-parts of a mosquito. Whether this is probable is a matter of interpretation depending on your definition of 'probable'. But your question is about ...


0

Trypanosoma, the parasitic protozoans that uses the TseTse fly as vector to reach its definitive host, a mammal. In wild mammals, Trypanosoma brucei has no noticeable impact (Chatterjee, 2009). I don't know about Trypanosoma cruzi. Parasite who recently transferred from one host to another are often the most virulent. In the particular case of a parasite ...


13

A mosquito's proboscis isn't like that of a butterfly, which could easily have nectar clinging to it when it is coiled up; instead, consider that the part of the mosquito's proboscis that enters a blood vessle is probably wiped clean when it is retracts outward through the epithelium. A a dirty needle or razor is many, many times larger than the sucking ...


75

No, this is not possible. There are a few reasons for that, but most important are that the only thing a mosquito injects is its own saliva, while the blood is sucked into the stomach where it is digested. To be able to infect other people HIV would need to be able to leave the gut intact and then also be able to replicate in the mosquitos which it cannot ...



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