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I assume there must be a maximum size for insects, and I atmospheric oxygen probably has something to do with it. Insects do not breath like vertebrates, they have a series of tubes call trachea that run through their bodies and open to the surface at spiracles. Air passes through these tubes and oxygen and CO2 passively diffuse through the tissues. Insects ...


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That is the larva of a carpet beetle. Larvae feed on natural fibers and can damage carpets, furniture, clothing and insect collections. "Anthrenus verbasci - larva side (aka)" by André Karwath aka Aka on Wikimedia Related question: What kind of caterpillar is this?, though I think that the larva photographed in that example is either of a different ...


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I think this may be a fly killed by the fungi Entomophthora muscae (most likely) or maybe a Cordyceps fungus. These are fungi which mainly attacks insects, and you sometimes see attacks as white, swollen abdomens in flies. These types of fungi are also known to change the behaviour of infected individuals, so that they e.g. climb up tall plants to die, to ...


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I think I found it. It can be Lacewings: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysopidae


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It belongs to Pentatomidae family. More on the Wiki page


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Yes. Use Joy. Exposure time essential. Use lots of soap, let sit on him for 10 min. To drown them out. Follow up with a very thick lather of olive oil. Rinse for like a half hour. Or just get some advantage.


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It's a general phenomenon that the time scale correlates with the size scale of complex systems. Energy consumption is the main concern dealing with the speed for biological organizations. In the absolute sense, a turtle has a higher speed than a small bug. But based on their sizes, the bug seems much quicker and faster. So we need to normalize the speed ...


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An increase in linear dimension by $x$ causes an increase of $x^3$ in volume and mass. The force that a muscle can generate roughly scales with the cross-sectional area of the muscle, an increase of $x^2$ for a muscle scaled by a factor of $x$. This means that larger animals need proportionally larger muscles (by a factor of $\sqrt {x}$) to achieve ...


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Its definitely a True bug (Hemiptera), and based on its distinct pronotum and small head I'm guessing its a Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus). It is a common species that is also found in Indiana. They are aggresive predators and are part of the family Reduviidae also known as Assassin bugs. This is not a part of the world I know well though, and there might be ...


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The winter moth's preferred host plants are mainly deciduous trees, oak being the main food plant and also many fruit trees, birch and hazel. Females generally deposit eggs in bark crevices, under bark scales, bark snags and under lichen along tree trunks of host species. Eggs are initially small and green but gradually change colour to orange and then red ...


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Maybe this is a late answer, but the difference between an assasing bug (Reduviidae) and a squash bug (or leaf-footed bug, Coreidae) is the structure of the beak. Reduviidae, being predaceous, have relative short, bended beaks, made of three segments and do not go beyond the first pair of legs. Coreidae, herbivores, have a long beak made of four segments. ...



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