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I'm not an expert in this topic but I have read a reasonable amount on animal thermal regulation, especially in insects, so maybe I can give some insight into your question. First of all, an important thing I learned is that one must differentiate poikilotherms from homeotherms and endotherms from ectotherms. According to Randall et al (1997): Endotherms ...


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After the binding of a substrate to the active site of an enzyme a series of chemical reactions occur at the active site. These reactions in turn convert the substrate into product. So for these reactions to occur a specific arrangement of amino acids at the active site is necessary. Here's an example: In the $6th$ step of Glycolysis Glyceraldehyde-3-...


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The optimum pH for catalase can be found be a simple search. According to the Wikipedia entry for catalase it is approximately 7. With the exception of extreme pHs, which can cause denaturation, the pH optimum of enzymes is often related to the ionization of the amino acid residues that participate in the reaction (and hence their pKa). Often what happens ...


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It depends how you define an acid. For what it‘s worth, the chemical definition Google presents when I search is “a molecule or other species which can donate a proton or accept an electron pair in reactions”. On that basis the serine residue in the catalytic triad is acting as a weakly ionizing acid. Of course in aqueous solution a free serine hydroxyl ...


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At least one group who have published on the effect of pressure on enzyme activity (Cho and Northrop) are not interested in it from a practical point of view, i.e. they are not subjecting enzymic reactions to pressures that they think they encounter naturally. Instead they are using the effects of pressure to test the kinetic and thermodynamic predictions of ...


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These enzymes, while useful markers of disease, are not only produced during the disease state, and are not only produced in one organ. It is therefore not surprising that there are always low levels released into the biochemical milieu that is the blood. If there are not even low levels of the enzymes then that might indicate that the organ is not doing it'...


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First off, the difference between the types of inhibition: competitive inhibition: The inhibitor only binds to the substrate-free form of the enzyme. (Not necessarily at the active site!) uncompetitive inhibition: The inhibitor only binds to the substrate-bound form of the enzyme. noncompetitive inhibition: The inhibitor binds equally well to both the ...



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