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5

To explain the neurophysiological background to the existing answers I would like to add the following: The effect you are describing (pinkish appearance of white) is generally referred to as a negative after image and it is a direct reflection of the color opponency in the retina. The effect is caused by adaptation of the (in this case green) cones in the ...


3

The shift in color is caused by the proteins in your photoreceptors being used up and thus no longer being able to absorb the light. If you stare at a green wall, you're using up green sensing proteins. When you switch to a white wall you're now seeing more red and blue compared to green, and thus it appears pinkish. Your brain somewhat tricks you into ...


12

First recall that pink is white minus green, more or less. Now, your perception can be explained by adaptation: Neurons try to control their gain (amplification factor) to have roughly the same range of output. So if there's a lot of stimuli they like, they will reduce their gain, and vice versa. It can be thought of as a form of fast time-scale homeostasis ...


3

Iris is a thin, circular structure in the eye, responsible for controlling the diameter and size of the pupil and thus the amount of light reaching the retina. The color of the iris gives the eye its color. In optical terms, the pupil is the eye's aperture and the iris is the diaphragm that serves as the aperture stop. Color and structure of ...


1

With a small image small motion errors will cause misinterpretation and continuous focus efforts tiring that ciliary muscle. Keep your monitor distance comfortable, increase its brightness (smaller pupil larger depth of field) then increase font size. It's probably better to read from the further monitor. Because the monitor's increased distance, reduces ...


5

As you noted, the cornea needs oxygen, yet it's not vascular. It needs to get it's oxygen supply from diffusion. In the daytime, diffusion occurs from air through the tear film covering the cornea. The cornea spends about a third of it's lifetime under closed lids. At night, the tear film remains intact and is continuously replenished. The inner aspect of ...


3

Interesting question! Determining the focus of a visual image is carried out in the visual association area of the brain. Ultimately, this process results in focusing of the retinal image by adjustment of the shape of the lens in the eye. Lens shaping to focus the image is called accommodation The neuronal circuitry involved in accommodation includes the ...


5

The neurology of vision is an extremely complex subject and is difficult to describe with any brevity, because there is so very much going on in so many parts of the brain. It is estimated that about 50% of the pathways of the brain, and about 30% of the cortex are involved in vision (where only 8% of the cortex is devoted to touch, and 3% to hearing). Some ...


3

The connection between eyes and food pipe had to do nothing with the motion sickness because the visual inputs and outputs to these sensory information are processed in the brain itself, So there is not need for eyes and food pipe to be connected together in order to cause nausea. Vasovagal response or vasovagal response or vasovagal attack (also called ...


-1

The connection is almost certainly psychological. For me, I can watch Grey's Anatomy, Spartacus, or any number of bloody shows while eating, but while researching microsurgery I came across an image of a hand cut in half and it bothered me for an entire day. Therefore, for me at least (and likely others) nausea from gore is context dependent and therefore ...



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