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6

Your sugar substrate was sucrose. Yeast cells metabolise this by secreting an enzyme, invertase, which splits the disaccharide into glucose and fructose both of which can be fermented by yeast to produce CO2. According to this site Equal Original (blue packaging)  is a zero calorie sweetener that contains aspartame and acesulfame potassium as its ...


3

Remember that glycolysis yields 2 NADH as well as 2 net ATP. This NADH can be used to a terminal electron acceptor to produce an end product with a net gain of ATP. End-products of fermentation can include lactate, acetate, butyrate, propionate and ethanol, all of which generate different amounts of additional ATP. The exact pathways involved vary ...


2

Almost certainly not. Species occupy different niches due to their differing growth rates and tolerances. Interspecies quorum sensing and the symbiotic relationship that implies do exist(see: lichen), but open-air inoculation is unlikely to produce them. Why would the Brettanomyces simply kill time waiting for 'their turn'? It's likely they don't grow as ...


2

Suppose the cellular pool has $x$ATP before starting glycolysis. In the initial phosphorylation steps, we use up two ATP to get the total tally at $(x-2)$ATP. The following steps yields $4$ ATP which brings the final total to $(x+2)$ATP. Assuming the cell is performing fermentation, the two additional $NADH$ formed will not be contributing to any ATP gain. ...


1

I think the reason as to why glucose concentration is faster in the aerobic case than the anaerobic one, is perfectly explained by Chris. To summarize:- The energy requirement of the organism in both the condition remains more or less constant. Since aerobic respiration generates more energy per glucose,(38ATP) it takes more time for the same ...


1

Your graphs show two things: Starting at the same concentration (150mM/l) the metabolization of glucose is not linear under anaerobic conditions. The other observation is that under aerobic conditions the glucose is metabolized much slower. This is because under anaerobic conditions on 2 molecules of ATP are generated from the metabolization of one molecule ...


1

Equal is marketed as a "zero calorie" sweetener, with respect to human digestion. The sweetening agents are aspartame (Asp-Phe; a dipeptide) and acesulfame K. The maltodextrin and dextrose are probably bulking agents to give the product a free-flowing, poweder consistence. The "fermentables" in question are: Dextrose. This is another name of glucose, and ...


1

I don't have a definitive answer to this, but a little over a decade ago I was in an undergraduate lab that had a similar thing happen - a small amount of metabolism of a "control" group of bacteria fed artificial, sugar/calorie free sweeteners instead of sugar. Our running theories at the time were: Contamination. Always a problem in laboratory ...


1

from wikipedia: No-additive salts for canning and pickling In contrast to table salt, which often has iodide as well as anticaking ingredients, special canning and pickling salt is made for producing the brine to be used in pickling vegetables and other food-stuffs. This salt has no iodine added because the iodide can be oxidised by the ...


1

I've done experiments with yeast, and they can easily ferment glucose at the rate of 4g/L/d. Probably faster, if one were to optimize it. So your numbers don't seem crazy.



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