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Plants use both water and air as food using photosynthesis where water is split and recombined with carbon dioxide from air to make glucose. Overall, the chemical reaction of photosynthesis is as follows: Light energy + plant enzymes 6CO2 + 12H2O ------------------------------------------------> C6H12O6 + 6O2 + 6H2O ...which means that it takes six ...


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You don't get energy from breaking chemical bonds, you only get energy from making chemical bonds, while breaking chemical bonds requires the input of energy. However, in practice chemical bonds are always broken as others are formed, and the net number of bonds is generally constant. Otherwise you would end up with free radicals, which are highly reactive ...


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Absolutely! The only limitation animals face on eating substances or objects is the size of the opening to their oral cavity, so if there is something on another planet that will fit in your mouth then you can definitely eat it. Whether one would be able to derive energy from the exo-material is an entirely different question.


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Short Answer- No, chances are negligible. Long Answer- Digestion is a chemical process which is mediated by enzymes. Enzymes are highly choosy molecules so that they only perform the work they're made for. In digestion, enzymes like proteases (for breaking down proteins), lipases (for breaking down lipids), amylases (for breaking down starch), DNAses (for ...


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This is a homework question but I will answer it (forgive me moderators ;). You will get your answer from this answer: Sucrose and starch are more efficient in energy storage when compared to glucose and fructose, but starch is insoluble in water. So it can't be transported via phloem and the next choice is sucrose, being water soluble and energy ...


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Generally, cold suppresses sweetness. As an example, consider soft drinks that are usually served cold: they taste sweeter when warm (like you said with your examples of drinks). Our taste receptors send a stronger signal to the brain when activated by warmer substances and so the perception of sweetness, in this case, is lessened when we consume cold food ...


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I found an article (1) which may help you understand what happened on your tongue: Light cooling from 37 to 21°C of beverages increases your sweet taste adaption, but not actual sweetness of your drink! Another article (2) states, that a certain receptor for sweet taste perception is heat-activated. So I guess there is no universal rule for any drink, you ...


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In the case you're talking about (just using vinegar to taste), there should be no effect whatsoever on a healthy stomach. The stomach already contains a significant amount of acid, and a little bit more from the acetic acid in vinegar won't change much, just like eating some citrus fruit with a meal (oranges, lemons, and whatnot) won't change much. ...


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What's interesting with this one is we don't really know very well the mechanism behind what's called chilling injury. It happens to a range of fruits, like bananas, peaches, avocado, or apples. The belief is that the chilling alters membrane permeability to storage vacuoles inside the plant cells. Try On Food and Cooking, pp.269, and Puig et al. (2015) for ...



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