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I'm going to treat this as a partial homework question but provide some guidance as to how you can potentially address your question and have solid theory to back it up. Chymotrypsin preferentially cleaves peptide amide bonds where the carboxyl side of the amide bond (the P1 position) is a large hydrophobic amino acid (tyrosine, tryptophan, and ...


4

There are already many great answers to your question, however I thought I put my comments in form of an answer. The standard for DNA agarose gel is TAE and for the protein, it depends on the size of the protein and the gel type used! Some times MOPS works best and sometimes Tris-acetate works best. It really depends on the gel used and also the protein and ...


4

Grossly, it does not matter what buffer you use. It is the pH that matters. For DNA electrophoresis EDTA is added in order to chelate divalent cations that serve as cofactors for nucleases. Tris is the base of the buffer and is used to set pH. Along with Tris one can use Boric acid, Acetic acid or phosphoric acid for adjusting the pH. The buffering range ...


4

The question which buffer for DNA is better is quite old. Both have their pros and cons and I list a few of them: TBE is a better conductor and is thus less prone for overheating the gel Borate is a powerful enzyme inhibitor, so if you want to apply enzymatic steps downstream, TAE is the better choice TAE gives a better resolution for large fragments TBE ...


4

I have had good experience using a lithium boric acid buffer from Faster Better Media. I use it for RNA gels, but it's advertised for DNA gels. I don't think it can do protein, but I've never tried it. I'm not an electrician, but higher conductivity may be the opposite of what you want. The lithium boric acid buffer claims to have less conductivity than a ...


0

@Chris's suggestion is very possible, high salt characteristically shows this towards the end of the gel. But there are additional suspects. This looks like it's just an agarose gel, Correct? I've seen a few things cause this including the gel not being level, the gel shifting during during it's run the percentage of agarose not being uniform and the ...


1

If the ladder is on an edge of the gel, it may be a process of different density as a result of how the gel cooled (or was poured too slowly). I've loaded more DNA loaded in a gel and it doesn't cause this kind of warping for me. It may be the buffer of the ladder is different from that used to make the gel. Your bands don't look particularly sharp, so I ...



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