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If it was detectable in a microarray, the odds are very good for RT-rtPCR. If you are designing your own primers, make sure they span an exon junction, or if the gene is intronless, then span the UTR to exon junction to avoid amplifying DNA.


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If the question allows you to assume that eye-colour is a typical gene with two alleles, then we can figure out the answer. If flies' eye-colour has two alleles - dominant and recessive - then the phenotype will be dominant (red - A) or recessive (white - a). Dominant traits need only one dominant allele, so the genotype can be Aa or AA. The only other ...


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There are certain very well defined groups of genes that you would expect to be co-expressed, e.g. ribosomal proteins, proteosome subunits, splicesome components, VHATPase subunits; and each of these groups are co-expressed in different circumstances. It therefore looks to me that either your different tumour tissues (if that is the situation) are in similar ...


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Check the beautiful publication of Daniel Ramsk├Âld et al. 2009, which holds the numbers for generally anticipated co-expression. The specific level of co-expression, which applies to your scenario, will depend upon your tissue, your thresholds, and your definition of co-expression. It you look for a co-change of some genes across different specimen (rather ...


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Cognate means of common origin. In molecular biology, cognate is used to refer to known interacting pairs of functional entities. For example, cognate receptor of a ligand means the primary (default) receptor with which this ligand interacts. Similarly, cognate sites (which also includes enhancer) of a transcription factor (TF) refers to the well known and ...



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