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8

...would then be his offspring at risk? Why? No. Generally speaking, fathers do not pass on their mtDNA (Mitochondrial DNA). Why? Because the mitochondria present in oocytes (egg cell) is the mother's, as every oocyte directly inherits the mother's mitochondria when they are made in the reproductive organs. The mitochondria that the sperm from the ...


5

I would suggest searching the name in any trusted genetics database such as NCBI's GenBank (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/). You can just Google search it, but it may take a little longer to find useful information that way. I hope this helps and good luck with your research, CDB


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According to this website, it is a mnemonic for "lambda excision". I have also found this usage in scientific literature (Harami et al., 2013). However, neither of these sources reference anything and I cannot find any defining paper. Almost all papers simply refer to it as lexA. As far as I can find (it's difficult to dig up these old papers), this is how ...


4

I'd go with Lambda Excision A. Terms like lex or rec often stand for what'd be termed a mnemonic, where for example rec may stand for recombination, or umu for UV mutator. The naming conventions can be difficult. Edit: A 1981 study by Roger Brent and Mark Ptashne notes some data from initial studies that showed the lexA repressor downregulated a number of ...


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There is nothing intrinsic to DNA methylation itself that requires it to repress transcription. Simply, it affects sequence recognition by proteins. CpG methylation can prevent transcription factor binding and/or recruit proteins that inhibit transcription, either competitively or through chromatin condensation. This is why it's generally associated with ...


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TL;DR: Chymosin is similar to pepsin and I couldn't find any evidence of functional/expressed chymosin gene in human genome. It seems like a common misconception that chymosin is functional in humans. Already in 1940s it has been shown that rennin (aka chymosin) is absent from "gastric juice" in adult humans. Genetically there is only pseudo-gene for ...


3

Physical and genetic interactions are described in the help wiki, accessed via the top menu bar on the page you linked to. Physical interactions refer to experiments where the gene product (protein) has been shown to physically interact with another protein, such as by co-immunoprecipitation, fluorescent staining, yeast two-hybrid system, etc. Genetic ...


2

Was getting long in the comments. In light of your comments, you might be interested in Gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA). You can do a GSEA using your set, the other one coming from reference databases such as MSigDB (see here). You can categorize your list by gene families using this technique for example. You can get an idea of what cellular process ...


2

It depends; what species are the genes from? Some organisms have extensively annotated genomes, and actively curated species-specific databases, while other species may not even have a reference genome sequence available. By itself, a priori, if you were lucky, about all you list would tell you was how to spell the names of those genes--if you're lucky. But ...


2

If the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is considered a reputable source (it should be), you can check out their Defining the gene page which has an overview of the beads-on-a-string theory, and how it was disproved by Seymour Benzer. You could also try to find Benzer's original paper, although it doesnt seem to be available online. Related and possibly ...


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TL;DR: Ubiquitin. Occasional occurrence of paternal inheritance of mtDNA has been suggested in mammals including humans. Clearly, spermatozoa have mitochondria; they make the energy needed for motility. Paternal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) does enter oocytes. It is a persisting fallacy that only maternal mtDNA is present in humans because only oocyte ...


1

Also try putting the list through Reactome or String DB to see if you see mapping to certain pathways. http://string-db.org/ You can also put lists through ConceptGen to carry out ontology based analyses http://portal.ncibi.org/gateway/conceptgen.html


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I wouldn't expect different methods to give the same results. Further, why are you even testing non-normalized datasets, the results of that are completely and utterly useless for any purpose other than showing that normalization is important. In addition, an T-test is a special case of an ANOVA (and of course limma is itself using a moderated T-test, though ...


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Delivering siRNA in vivo is a difficult prospect, but has been overcome in research environments and several commercial in vivo solutions are on the market see examples from Life Technologies here. The bigger problems come from potential off-target effects. siRNA tend to be double stranded and both the 'guide' and 'passenger' strand can occasionally target ...



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