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It's interesting that not only the leader 19, but also 16 and 17 follow a similar trend. Perhaps their size could be the best weight/length proportion to ensure a safe replication? Then what would have to be explained would be 18, so far to the left. That could be if 18 is newer, resulting from the split of a larger chromosome or the fusion of two smaller, ...


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This Nature paper from 2004, by Jane Grimwood et al. goes at least a long way towards giving an answer to the question of the OP. In short: there were inordinately many duplications, especially during an event 30-40 million years ago, as well as during a much more recent event. These duplications are, uncharacteristically, predominantly intra-chromosomal ...


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There are certain very well defined groups of genes that you would expect to be co-expressed, e.g. ribosomal proteins, proteosome subunits, splicesome components, VHATPase subunits; and each of these groups are co-expressed in different circumstances. It therefore looks to me that either your different tumour tissues (if that is the situation) are in similar ...


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Check the beautiful publication of Daniel Ramsk├Âld et al. 2009, which holds the numbers for generally anticipated co-expression. The specific level of co-expression, which applies to your scenario, will depend upon your tissue, your thresholds, and your definition of co-expression. It you look for a co-change of some genes across different specimen (rather ...


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It can be a little confusing. A genetic allele is just a portion of the genome responsible for an observable trait or phenotype. Examples of phenotypes consist of your example (eye color) and millions of others. As @swbarnes alluded to, most phenotypes are complex phenotypes, meaning they are not described by a single genetic locus. Height, weight, hair ...


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I think the "gene drive" that you are talking about involves the CRISPR system, and it is an engineered run of code that deliberately makes that allele 'super dominant' (by making more CRISPR components that are loaded with the particular gene replacement instructions), like in a scenario where they are trying to replace the faulty gene for Huntington's ...


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does this mean that we can say for certain (given a correct screen) that the child has a 3/4 chance of having the dominant characteristic (expressed) and a 1/4 chance of having the recess characteristic? If you are sure that the phenotype is 100% determined by that allele only, then yes, barring things like new mutations. Biology always has some ...


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Please ask questions about Bioconductor on the Bioconductor support site. Bioconductor also distributes 'annotation' packages with curated information. These don't rely on a web service, so are always available, and are fixed at each (6 month) Bioconductor release, but are less comprehensive. Choose your organism BiocInstaller::biocLite(c("org.Hs.eg.db", "...


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Take a look at the biomaRt package. This package allows you to access some databases in R directly. Quote from the user's guide: The package enables retrieval of large amounts of data in a uniform way without the need to know the underlying database schemas or write complex SQL queries. Examples of BioMart databases are Ensembl, Uniprot and ...



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