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So the term allele is a broad one, and simply refers to the different versions of any piece of DNA in circulation in the gene pool - it doesn't need to refer to a gene. I can talk about the alleles at a random place in the genome. But if we proceed with your question and ask - 'do nonsense mutations within coding genes also lead to the creation of different ...


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Allele is just a variant form of gene: independent of the final product of protein, so nonsense will also lead to new allele. I will quote Nature Scitable here: Alleles can also refer to minor DNA sequence variations between alleles that do not necessarily influence the gene's phenotype.


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It turns out if you set the font.size in the graphNEL object, you can see the node names in the plot of the inducedTermGraph. Setting font.size to >20 worked for me!


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The primary product of protein coding genes are mRNAs. When we talk about measuring gene expression we want to assay the steady-state levels of a specific mRNA within a cell. This is usually accomplished by starting with a large number of cells and harvesting all of the mRNAs from all of the cells. One way to measure the expression level of just one ...


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According to next generation data: I was never working directly with mRNA but what I got from the bioinformatician was something like this: you extract your mRNA, sequence it, filter it according to the quality & length, assemble it and what you then have is something like "transcripts". Those you are counting: xy of transcript1 & yx of ...


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Normally only one strand of DNA is transcribed. This is possible because for the RNA polymerase to bind and start transcribing the DNA into mRNA (or pre-mRNA) a special sequences on the DNA called a promoter is needed. Promoters will normally only be positioned to allow transcription in one direction, i.e. of one DNA strand. Bacteria and their viruses ...


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If a piece of DNA were to be transcribed on both strands, at the same time, the transcription complexes would collide and inhibit each other, like steric hindrance. If you could overcome this interference and synthesize primary transcripts from both strands, it follows that the two RNAs would hybridize to each other and form complementary RNA-RNA hybrids. ...


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Here is the results summary of the study that describes the discovery of DNA:RNA hybrid virus: Results Bioinformatic analysis of viral metagenomic sequences derived from a hot, acidic lake revealed a circular, putatively single-stranded DNA virus encoding a major capsid protein similar to those found only in single-stranded RNA viruses. The presence ...


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Yeast strains have two mating types MATa (since it secretes a pheromone named 'a factor'), MATα (secretes pheromone 'α factor'). Both MATa and MATα strains are haploid and when they fuse together they form diploid zygote. A haploid yeast has only one set of genes and utilize chemicals like histidine and tryptophan (amino acids) and adenine (part of DNA, ATP ...



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