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Yes There is. In 2013, $\large Dr.\ Liisa\ Ukkola-Vuoti,\ University\ of\ Helsinki,\ Finland$, done a detailed GWCNV(Genome-Wide Copy Number Variation Analysis) Analysis of certain group of people for musical creativity and aptitude. Genome-Wide Copy Number Variation Analysis in Extended Families and Unrelated Individuals Characterized for Musical Aptitude ...


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As most of the comment have pointed it out, It's nearly impossible to find out. This is my try: Dr. L Alexander wrote in his paper, Medical Science under Dictatorship: Hitler issued the first direct order for euthanasia in Germany on September 1, 1939, as his Panzers moved on the Blitzkrieg of Poland. Organizations with humanitarian-sounding names ...


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Well, that depends on your home. ;) I think it is not an easy process. There are two main methods that are used to genetically modify plants: Using the bacterium, Agrobacterium tumifaciens, as a vector for the DNA. Agrobacterium has the ability to infect plants and insert DNA into a plant's genome. It causes crown gall tumours in natural infections. This ...


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Yes, It is. I found this Awesome video on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MiZ35pkxG-k How to do: Materials: Planter Soil Table Salt Seeds(fern) Petri Dish Vinegar Water 1.5V Battery Wire Human hair with follicles Procedure: In a pertri plate add 10mL of Vinegar with 0.1g Salt. Mix the seeds to the solution Put the human hair ...


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Without any molecular evidence you could infer convergent evolution if the species being compared shared a common ancestor that lacked the trait in question. With genomic and developmental data you would measure the degree of similarity shared between the relative factors in each species. Little or no similarity indicates convergent evolution. Horizontal ...


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Females are defined as the sex that produces that bigger gamete (ovule) while the males are those from the gender that produce the smaller gametes (spermatozoid). Because producing big gametes is costly, the number of females fix the reproductive limit in the population and in other words the variance in reproductive success in males is higher than in ...


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Three factors that influence the number of legs are: 1) Sex : In some species of myriapoda, the females have been found to have more leg segments than males (reference) eg: Himantarium gabrielis 2) age Growth is by adding segments and legs with successive molts (anamorphic), and myriapods continue to add additional segments and legs after they ...


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As far as we know, chromosomes tend to be equally distributed across normal gameteogenesis, following Mendel's second law of independent assortment. However some versions of DNA repair and chromosomal condensation can malfunction and result in more versions of one parents genes in a cell than another. Two phenomena which are exceptions to the equal parental ...


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Why bother predicting proteins badly from DNA sequence when you could have just as well downloaded the manually curated human proteome? As to your questions: Are you asking about human genomes or genomes in general? The vast majority of the variance in human genomes is in non-coding sequence. As to genomes in general, they vary in pretty much every ...


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No, your approach will not work, you are taking a very simplistic view of an extremely complex system. Some of the problems you are ignoring are: Genes (eukaryotic genes anyway) are spliced to produce mRNA, a process that removes introns and leaves only the exons. If you just translate the entire chromosome file you will get noise. Splicing also changes ...


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You might want to look at the Danish Data archive: http://www.sa.dk/content/us/about_us/danish_data_archive I have never used their data and I don't know what barriers there might be to accessing it, but the impression I got at a talk by Soren Brunak (http://ctbr.hunter.cuny.edu/Brunak), was that this was one of the most complete databases for studying ...


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Was it necessary for the common ancestor with fused chromosome 2 to mate with another creature whose 2 chromosomes fused in a similar manner? Of course not. People with balanced translocations have kids with people with the wild-type chromosome arrangement all the time. Such people have some fertility problems, due to problematic meiosis leading ...


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is the difference between humans and mice due primarily to the different order of the genes or to the slight differences in the genes themselves? The latter. This question was raised from a claim here which seems to imply it does not matter. You are talking about two different things. Gene expression is often controlled by nearby DNA ...


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Ye, the order matters. This can be seen in chromosomal translocations which can cause cancer. A example for that would be the translocation of IRF4 which happens in a subtype of multiple myeloma. The translocation is permanently activating the transcription factor. See here for details: Translocations activating IRF4 identify a subtype of germinal ...


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There are many protein deficiency issues caused by genetic mutation for eg: Protein C whose deficiency causes abnormal blood clots. This protein is controlled by the PROC gene whose mutation causes Type I Protein C deficiency (reference). There are treatments of replacing proteins like in the case of Protein C deficiency, protein C concentrates are used ...


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As the previous answer said, there are some public HP1 ChIP-seq data from D. melanogaster if not from the DGRP, from modENCODE and maybe others. In the case of modENCODE, they've published not only the reads, but also their peak calls (mapping with Eland + calling with MACS). BEDTools ( https://github.com/arq5x/bedtools2 )is a nice command line tool for ...


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Shorter answer: The dominant/recessive paradigm that is taught in middle school and high school is not universally applicable. It accurately describes only a small number of phenotypes, compared to all the genotype/phenotype interactions which an organism exhibits. It was a useful place to start when it came to unraveling the relationship between genes ...


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I haven't found 1.5 Mb, but 1 Megabase. This is the case for the shh gene in chicken, where the enhancer element is located 1 Mb upstream. The original article can be found here: "A long-range Shh enhancer regulates expression in the developing limb and fin and is associated with preaxial polydactyly." There are two reviews which are also interesting in ...


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An allele is not dominant or recessive by itself. It is dominant or recessive compared to another allele. Therefore, if you consider one locus (position on a sequence) that has two alleles (bi-allelic locus), you cannot have two dominant or two recessive alleles. It is like saying that two things are darker. In reality you can either say that one is darker ...


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for biomart goto below link http://central.biomart.org/converter/#!/ID_converter/gene_ensembl_config_2 Also there is one more converter which i found pretty useful http://biodbnet.abcc.ncifcrf.gov/db/db2db.php#biodb


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When two alleles show codiminance, they are not described as dominant or recessive relative to each other. They are simply codiminant to each other. The same applies to incomplete dominance. Note that all these terms are relative to the alleles you're talking about. An allele that is dominant over one allele may be recessive to another and codiminant with ...


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Have a look at these ChIP-seq data for HP1 in Drosophila: 1, 2 and 3. From ChIP-seq data you can find the distance between the TFBS peaks and the TSS of the gene. You can also look for nucleosome positioning and DNAse hypersensitvity regions; for the former, I am sure that data is available for Drosophila.


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Heterochromatin profile is of course different in different cells but I am not sure if absolute heterochromatin content will vary greatly. This DNAse hypersensitivity region data is for human cells but same principles apply to all organisms. If I have to take a guess then I would say that quiescent cells are likely to have more heterochromatin. ...


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Researchers at Ghent University have made a discovery that downregulation of the proteins CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) and FRUITFULL (FUL) lead to the development of many perennial traits in annual plants (in the study Arabidopsis thaliana is used) (reference). The CONSTANS gene controls flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana (reference). FRUITFULL (FUL) is an MADS box ...


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Virus is a non-living but infectious structure consisting of a nucleic acid core and envelope covering. The envelope is what determines target specificity. If you are genetically engineering, lets say a retrovirus (which if you are writing a sci-fi book this is probably the type of virus you are wanting to write about, for many reasons) you would want to ...


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I understand the question as "can you get any animal to have heritable traits selected by humans?" This definition of domestication implies that a population of animals can be bred for a sufficiently long period of time, so that humans can select hereditary traits that fit their needs. Humans could provide selective pressure that creates a new variety with ...


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Yes, it is possible and probably you won't need many literary artifices to make it work. Essentially viruses are what is technically called "obligate intracellular parasites". Parasites because they cannot grow by themselves, they need a host cell from which they "steal" the intracellular machinery to replicate; intracellular because they grow inside cells; ...


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A couple of months ago I listened to a plant physiologist who strongly recommended recombination-based mapping over sequencing based mapping. The main reason he gave was the error-rate of 2nd generation sequencing. The error rate on Illumina platforms are about 1 % if I recall. In a small genome like that of Arabidopsis thaliana (157 Mbp) that accounts for ...


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Depending on the exact goal of the experiment, the researchers may back-cross both to smooth out genetic variation between individuals and to potentially normalize expression of a transgene, although once you get past the chimeric stage gene expression should be fairly stable. In my experience, back-crossing allows you to generate a genetically-altered mouse ...



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