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1

Taken from "24/192 Music Downloads... and why they make no sense": Sampling rate and the audible spectrum I'm sure you've heard this many, many times: The human hearing range spans 20Hz to 20kHz. It's important to know how researchers arrive at those specific numbers. First, we measure the 'absolute threshold of hearing' across the entire ...


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If all the processes through which a signal passes are linear, then it makes sense to speak in terms of a maximum useful-content frequency. If a signal passes through non-linear stages, however, it is possible that frequency content which would in and of itself be above the range of hearing, may interact with other frequency content which is also above that ...


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Yes, we can. By means of bone conduction we can hear up to 50 kHz, and values up to 150 kHz have been reported in the young (Pumphrey, 1950). However, it is indeed generally agreed that 20 kHz is the upper acoustical hearing limit through air conduction. The reason for this is debated, but the transfer function of the middle ear ossicle chain is a suspected ...


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Hearing declines with age and, typically, high frequencies are affected first. Age-related hearing loss (or presbyacusis (Kujawa & Liberman, 2006)) is progressive and starts at the highest frequencies and as a person ages the lower frequencies are affected. The reduction in hearing sensitivity is caused by the loss of hair cells. Hair cells are sensory ...


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I will provide an answer in 2 parts. The first part is a theoretical approach based on the absolute possible minimum (my original answer). The second part focuses on experiments in the peripheral auditory system (added edited answer). PART I: Absolute theoretical minimum (original answer) As you inquire about electrical signals in the auditory human system ...


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The average human auditory range is between $20$ Hz to $20$ kHz [1]. How this relates to time is by the definition of frequency. $$ f = \frac{1}{\text{time in sec}} = \frac{\omega}{2\pi} $$ where $\omega$ is angular frequency. So if a human can hear a sound frequency of $18$ kHz, then $$ (18\cdot 1000)^{-1} = 0.000056\text{ sec} $$ where $18$ kHz is $18000$ ...



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