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Short answer The main limitation to frequency discrimination is loudness. Background The cochlea is tonotopically organized - it basically acts as a Fourier transformer, where different frequencies are analyzed on a place map (Fig. 1). Frequency tuning of cochlear hair cells is mainly limited by sound intensity. The louder a pure-tone sound stimulus gets, ...


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As @AliceD mentioned, cochlear implant is one of the earliest achievements of neural engineering. However, there are orders of magnitude more inner hair cells (IHC) and even more auditory nerve fibers (AN) in human cochlear than the current cochlear implants offer electrodes. If you are interested in a more detailed model of IHC to AN signal transmission, ...


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Devices that bypass the hair cells in the inner ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve are called cochlear implants. Cochlear implants are used to treat deafness caused by the loss of hair cells in the cochlea. The hair cells are the sensory cells that convert sound vibrations into electric neural signals (Purves et al., 2001). With state-of-the-art ...


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Short answer Echolocating bats have relatively large sensory epithelia in their inner ear, that may correlate with their high upper frequency limit of up to 200 kHz. The basilar membrane is thinner and stiffer, possibly allowing it to decode higher frequencies. Background In terms of the place theory of hearing, the cochlea acts as a frequency transformer, ...



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