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I remember going to a chemistry lecture which mentioned this (the lecture was on blood transfusion in general). The main reasons are: 1) Hemoglobin is toxic to the human body: Hb in RBCs is a tetramer, but in the plasma it breaks into two dimers --> toxicity in the kidneys. Hb needs modification by cross-linking or recombination. Wikipedia states that this ...


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Yes it can. You will want to use a thin hemocytometer and the working distance of the objective (20x) needs to be long enough to focus both the cells under the cover glass and the grid under the hemocytometer. Because you are looking at it from the top it would be helpful probably to have some phase on the scope to increase your contrast so that you can more ...


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It sounds like you need a microscope for standard microbiology lab tests. At a minimum, any standard wide-field/brightfield microscope would work. If most of your histology work involves colorimetric stains (e.g., H&E, gram staining), you don't need any fluorescence capability. If you are working with a lower budget, look at the new lines of LED-based ...


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It's a direct correlation between the ABO blood groups and the Roman numerals. O - I A - II B - III AB - IV The numeric system was pioneered by Jan Jansky of Czechoslovakia in the early 20th century. Apparently it is still used in some former Soviet republics. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC537907/?page=1


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No. When a different blood type is introduced in the body, the host immune system recognizes the foreign blood as non-self and attacks it. The transfused blood becomes useless, and the potentially massive immune reaction can cause shock, which itself can be fatal. More details in the book Blood Groups and Red Cell Antigens, which can be found at the NCBI ...


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So in case of Splenectomy (complete surgical removal of the spleen), what would be the fate of red blood cells? Would this cause Polycythemia? According to wikipedia none of the side effects are related to red blood cell count (just the quality of those cells). As splenectomy causes an increased risk of sepsis due to encapsulated organisms ...


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The spleen is not the only organ which removes "old" erythrocytes, this happens as well in the liver and the lymph nodes. The whole process is termed Eryptosis, the Apoptosis of Erythrocytes. During the aging of erythrocytes sialic acid on their outer membrane surface is removed. This leads to the recognition by macrophages and phagocytosis of this cells by ...



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