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Proteins can move around the membrane. The protein does move: the membrane is a liquid crystal and has fluid behaviour. Specifically this is due to the membrane being in a gel-state. This gel state allows phase behaviour which means that the protein is able to move around on the surface by a similar process. This is often referred to as the fluid mosaic ...


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The intracellular receptor for cortisol is called NR3C1. http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/P04150 To my knowledge, a direct (competitive) effect of anabolic steroids on the binding of cortisol to NR3C1 has never been proven. The anabolic effects can easily be explained by other targets. A good starting point for further reading might be this review: ...


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I'll bifurcate the question and answer each part one at a time. Germ layer formation: Gastrulation is a phase early in the embryonic development of most animals, during which the single-layered blastula is reorganized into a trilaminar ("three-layered") structure known as the gastrula. These three germ layers are known as the ectoderm, mesoderm, and ...


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As I understand your question, you ask about genetic mapping which has been demonstrated in the HGP (human genome project). The human genome project: enabled humans to find the gene responsible for relatively rare, single-gene inherited disorders such as cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy is useful in guiding scientists to the many genes ...


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Generally speaking, there is no effect in microinjections. This is relevant in the real world example of micro-injections. A video of a pronucleus injection can be seen here, or here is a more thoroughly explained procedure involving cloning. As you can see in the video the membrane, almost no effect will be observed - molecular dynamic simulations show ...



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