New answers tagged

1

- NO,for capillary action 2 things are of importance 1) the radius of capillary tube[R] ,2)the tension force between molecules at surface of liquid [T] (for water=72.8 dynes/cm= 728 X 10^-6 N) - height to which the fluid will rise due to cap.effect, H=(2T cosα)÷(ρgR) - [ρ=density of liq,here water =1000kg/m³] - numer.=constant(for given liq) denomin.=...


6

No. Your supposition is incorrect — the phosphate in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate has to come from somewhere, and it comes from glucose 6-phosphate. The reason a second ATP is required before you get to the triose phosphate stage in glycolysis is that you are generating two molecules of triose phosphate. In the pentose phosphate pathway (energy-producing non-...


0

This question is a bit broad. You have to understand a lot of concepts to figure out the nature of the allele. I'll just point out some basics: If an allele is dominant it should affect both males and females equally (not X-linked) If one of the parents shows the trait (while other does not) then at least one offspring should show the trait (basic ...


0

ATP is the end result of breaking apart glycogen. This isn't a trick question imo, it's in every textbook that glycogen is a primary store of "will soon become ATP" materials, like glucose. The keyword here is "primary," as there are other ways of getting and storing ATP... that is, putting oxygen and glucose into the cells, and then there is always ...


3

If you are only given glycogen and ATP as choices, then glycogen is the correct answer. The reason for this is, that muscle cells need ATP also for other very important processes (such as keeping the membrane potential stable and preventing cramps). Thus, while ATP is the actual fuel that powers myosin to create the muscle force, the cell needs to keep the ...


2

This is a typical MCQ which in order to answer you have to have been at somebody’s lectures or be able to read his mind. The antithesis of education! Cells don’t store energy like car batteries. Glycogen in muscle is a store of carbohydrate. It can be used to generate ATP if it is broken down to glucose and the glucose glycolysed. I wouldn’t have chosen ...


1

During meiosis, the independent assortment will be made first and then cross over will be made. No, independent assortment occurs after crossing over. Crossing over occurs in prophase I while independent assortment occurs in metaphase I and anaphase I. I am so confused, what is the difference between this two process? During prophase I, a process ...


2

This is a very rough draft about the case, not verified, and should not be used for any medical conditions. Ask your own doctor. It is just for demonstrating some Mathematics and genetic passing generally. Condition: Muscular atrophy Differential conditions: TODO Support: history of genetic passing in -1 and -3 generations Disease Muscular atrophy as a ...


2

I don't know if this is just me, but I'd consider this a pretty badly worded question. For models of population dynamics, the rate at which the size of a population changes over time is normally accepted to be the net balance of four fundamental processes: Birth, Immigration, Death, and Emigration ('BIDE'; see for example here). Birth and immigration ...


0

I feel answers A & C are more obvious. option D is countered by Birthrate. also, migration is a temporary affair, check its meaning (An instance of moving to live in another place for a while). whereas emigration is to permanently move to a new location and populate that area.


2

There are three "omic" definitions that might help you. The DNA is the long term storage of the information. You're probably familiar with this concept, and the study of this type of information is genomics. One of the major functions of DNA is it's use as the blueprint for the production of proteins. Proteins carry out all sorts of structural and ...


2

Oxigen goes from the alveolar's lumen to the cytoplasm of the erythrocyte, and that's 5 membranes: the "top" of the alveolar epithelial cell the "bottom" of such cell the "top" of the endothelial cell (capillary) the "bottom" of such cell the erythrocyte membrane You got all the cells right, but your only problem was this: oxygen diffuses through the ...


2

COPD is not caused by an infection (which would require a pathogen) but by the inflammation reaction the body triggers because of the tar particles. Thus the statement "mucus accumulated causing infection" does not correctly describe the effect of tar on the lung. Consequently, B and C are incorrect.


2

There is another way to look at this question, which I suspect is even quicker (it is certainly more intuitive for me). Mathematically, it is identical to Mark's answer. If the parent chooses to not sacrifice herself to save the child, they have a net fitness of 1.5 (1 parent + 0.5 child) if they escape, and 0 fitness if they do not. Therefore, their ...


3

It doesn't have to be that complicated. The evolutionary value of the offspring to the mother is half that of herself (0.5). Then the relative value of both mother and offspring is 1 + 0.5 = 1.5. So the value of preserving both lives is about 3 times the value of preserving the offspring alone, given the simplistic assumptions from the question. Therefore, ...



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