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Yes, the mechanism of patellar locking does occur in quadrupeds too. Although they are 4 limbed, a major portion of the weight is borne by the hind limbs. This is known as the stay apparatus and includes the mechanisms of Patellar locking, reciprocal mechanism and check apparatus. On the other hand in the forelimb, although there is no locking mechanism as ...


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Unfortunately, your question isn't clear. "Why" could mean different things. What course of events led to it? What benefits does it provide? We could just say, it's not disadvantageous this way, so why not. So perhaps you could clarify. Evolutionarily, through the stages as our ancestors evolved from small mammal to human, the changes that occurred were ...


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I am no expert on comparative anatomy, but I will give this a shot. Please edit if you know more about this subject! The configuration of opposing elbow and knee joints is a feature we humans share with large group of mammals. For example, below is an image of a shrew skeleton. Opposing joints are course a major feature of mammalian anatomy, and there ...


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It's an amazing question, really. And you might be right about your assumption. In the womb, our legs and arms bent in the same direction. But as the foetus continued to develop, the legs and arms rotated to bend in opposite direction (to each other). As of now, there is no rational explanation as to why this happens. So I guess all we can do is be grateful ...


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It depends on the size and the location. After both world wars plenty of people had odd bits of shrapnel wandering about inside them for years, because it would be too difficult or dangerous to get it out. We had a dog who carried a few shotgun pellets inside her, shallowly enough for one to feel one of them under her skin. No point in subjecting the dog to ...



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