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3

The Y-chromosome only really contains genes relevant to sex determination[1], with estimates of protein-coding genes ranging from 50-450. For instance the SRY gene, also known as the testis-determining factor [2], is only found on the Y-chromosome. Phenotypes such as eye colour are coded on the autosomes (i.e. not the sex chromosomes), and as such are ...


2

Let's go step my step here. Going by your notation I'll call the square as Male and Circle as female. So from this information I can confidently say that you disease is not X linked dominant. Why? Because Females carry XX, that would mean to be X linked dominant she had to be X'X' for the disease allele to manifest it's phenotype. But if it were X'X, it ...


1

Extracting genomic DNA and PCR are different processes. Extracting genomic DNA means that you get all the DNA sequences from human genome. Using extracted DNA, you can amplify a specific region from the whole genomic sequence. A primer set is usually set at the both ends of a sequence you want to amplify the sequence. In your case, you the region ...


3

The References and External Links sections of the Wikipedia article in your question contain a great deal of relevant information to get you started. There is a link to the FBI's CODIS and NDIS (National DNA Index System) Fact Sheet, which contains a lot of relevant information, including part numbers for validated kits from several manufacturers. DOI ...


4

The genetics of pigmentation is relatively complicated, as the pathway for the pigmentation (regulation of the pigment production, ratio between the melanins, maturation, trafficking and distribution of the melanins from the melanocytes to other cells) is quite long and also subject to different regulations. All the mutations found to date (at least to my ...


1

Instead of dividing mutations into two classes, dominant vs. recessive, consider categorizing them into classes based on how the mutation affects the gene--or the gene product. This yields loss-of-function (lf) alleles, that reduce the activity of the gene, or its product, and gain-of-function (gf) alleles that act as if they somehow increase the activity ...


-1

Harmful alleles can be both recessive or dominant. They do not tend to be more recessive or more dominant. But, you must look at it from a population genetics point of view. When a allele is dominant, it tends to be a highly selected for trait, an analogy of this would be black eyes are a dominant trait compared to blue eyes or green eyes, which is why you ...


1

Assuming each gene symbol represents a unique gene or protein (this may not be true; see for gene name aliases in e.g. NCBI Entrez gene) you can get a lot of information programmatically. Below is an example using R and Bioconductor resources. Define your list of genes: # list of gene symbols, here we focus on one. > genes <- "KRAS" Load the ...


6

@March Ho's answer is an excellent answer based on the assumption that all of the observed phenotypic variance is due to genetic variance. Environmental variance The genetic variance is not the only underlying variance that can explain variance in phenotypic traits. There is probably quite a lot of phenotypic variance that is caused by the underlying ...


21

The uniqueness of irises and fingerprints are, as you said, limited to the number of possible permutations of irises and fingerprints. A similar problem exists in computer science, and is known as a hash collision. Given sufficient samples, there will always be a collision for a hash of finite size. However, the sample space is sufficiently large for iris ...


0

Folate, or rather its active form tetrahydrofolate (THF), is a coenzyme that carries a 1-carbon group. The carbon group can occur in various redox states: CH3-THF (methyl-THF), CH2-THF (methylene-THF), CH-THF (methenyl-THF) or CHO-THF (formyl-THF). These can be interconverted by a variety of enzymes, and are used by cells to synthesize a number of products, ...


0

You could store DNA diluted in water at -20C for a very long time. The only problem with at home storage would be the type of freezer most households have. These come standard with defrosting feature, which thaws up the freezer to remove the ice accumulation... This would affect the stability of the DNA at long term scale. Having a styrofoam box to protect ...


1

If you have access to a laboratory (or at the very least a centrifuge and pipettes) and some laboratory experience you can extract the DNA from the cells which would be much easier to store. There are a number of commercial DNA extraction kits available that are easy to find on google and order online. I don't want to promote any particular brand but I've ...



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