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2

Briefly speaking you expect more or less uniform coverage for reads. So if you see a systematic difference in quality scores or coverage for minor and major alleles or for forward and reverse strand, it could be an SNV, but most likely it is a technical issue. That's a 'dubious variant'. A lot of such biases are described in "Genotype and SNP calling from ...


2

My interpretation of the first question is why do traits determined by the environment appear to be equally similar among monozygotic and dizygotic twins in these twin studies. The studies he is talking about look at twins that are separated and adopted in to different families. These different families provide a different environment for either twin, and ...


1

You should be very careful trying to conclude something from what is known about Neandertal genetics. To answer question 1: NO! This is probably not what he meant. To date, we have only two high-quality full genomes of archaich humans, one being the (Neandertal from Denisova cave, called Altai Neandertal (Prüfer et al., 2014)) and one being the (Denisovan ...


3

I think the question mainly highlight either of two misunderstandings: misunderstanding about the definition of heritability misunderstanding why the slope of the regression line is equal to heritability (in the narrow sense). Definition of heritability Please have a look at the post Why is a heritability coefficient not an index of “how genetic” ...


4

Even though I am not sure I understand your question completely, I want to try to explain to you the genetic difference between humans and chimpanzees. I will work through your questions: We share 98.5% genes with chimps ,so there is about one percent difference .It means we can approximately differ from them by one base pair every hundred base pairs on ...


2

It is not always easy to say this with full force in natural sciences, but: NO, this theory is NOT true, probably not even by any means. Extraordinary claim require extraordinary evidence. But wow, there is NO evidence AT ALL for this claim. Before tackling the main point, I give a side note that would actually be sufficient to not be concerned with the ...


-1

both Suidae and Primates like every creature on earth have a common ancestor in history , but they are simply too different to breed together . Therefore the theory makes no sense , unless it uses pig and chimp in a metaphoric sense .


3

Briefly, the "theory" makes no genetic sense. Pig and human genomes have both been sequenced, and their sequences are completely incompatible with this model. The "theory" is completely idiotic in many other ways -- debunking it almost becomes difficult because there are so many ways it fails to make sense -- but the genetics alone make it impossible.


2

This is a very rough draft about the case, not verified, and should not be used for any medical conditions. Ask your own doctor. It is just for demonstrating some Mathematics and genetic passing generally. Condition: Muscular atrophy Differential conditions: TODO Support: history of genetic passing in -1 and -3 generations Disease Muscular atrophy as a ...


0

At least PacBio do provide some example datasets on their DevNet resource. You should be able to get a lot of different Illumina data from the public data in BaseSpace. I am not sure where to look for official samples from Roche 454, but I wouldn't bother too much as it is discontinued anyway. Rather go for MinIon or IonTorrent data, if you want more.


3

Thalassemia is a recessive trait. That means individuals with only one copy of the allele (Heterozygotes) have the "normal" phenotype (they don't have Thalassemia). If an individual is homozygous for the recessive allele they will have Thalassemia. Heterozygotes are often referred to as carriers as they can transmit the allele to their offspring, but do ...


2

The first definition is correct. A sex-linked trait is a trait affected by a locus on a sex chromosome. If you google sex-linked trait, you will find this same definition (not the exact same words) over and over again. The definition of sex-linked trait is NOT restricted to traits that are not unrelated to primary or secondary sexual organs. Any ...


1

Sex linked traits are those controlled by genes on the sex chromosomes, regardless of whether or not they are related to reproduction. This can be the major (e.g. X or Z) or minor (e.g. Y or W) sex chromosomes. "Sex linkage applies to genes that are located on the sex chromosomes. These genes are considered sex-linked because their expression and ...



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