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You may consider consulting the H2DB database. The database is quite new, so the number of heritability estimates is not very high at the moment (currently 225 estimates for human, 838 estimates in total), but it's a start. The database is described in a paper by Kaminuma et al.(2)


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What do you call an acquired trait? A trait acquired during the lifetime of the individual through its relationship with the environment (especially culture and traditions in humans)? If you take any population of living organisms, the variance of quantitative trait in this population, also called phenotypic variance and denoted $V_P$ is the result of the ...


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One example of an active selection pressure's effect on human phenotype is in areas where malaria is endemic, the prevalence of sickle cell anemia is higher. Sickle cell anemia is highly protective against malaria, and less people die from sickle cell than die from malaria, so you see a rise of sickle cell in the population. This is a small degree of ...


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Background I'd like to start by saying that traits phenotypic (loosely speaking phenotypic mean morphological) traits evolve because their variance is correlated with some genetic variance. If most of the phenotypic variance is genetically coded, you'd expect that the trait will change through if different variant of the trait influence fitness (which is a ...


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I got .59. In response to WYSIWYG: (Note: I'm using A and a for the two alleles. My copy of Bulmer uses B for the second, which makes a little more sense if the alleles are codominant.) a.) The AA x aa cross should be twice as common as the AA x AA and aa x aa crosses, just as HT is more common than HH or TT when we toss a pair of identical coins. In ...



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