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As an elaboration of my comment. Summary: Replication is required in GWAS studies to account for non-random technical biases. An example of such bias is, for example, a chip used for genotyping giving consistently incorrect genotypes for a locus. In this situation adding more subjects will not correct for this effect and therefore the only solution is to ...


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As with all serious scientific result GWAS results need to validated by others. In this case it think is extremely important because these studies link mutations to diseases or in more general given genotypes to phenotypes, thus pointing out possible causes. So validating these results with the use of independent "samples" is indeed crucial. But as I said ...


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mtDNA is present in a much higher copy number per cell than nuclear DNA. According to this paper, there are approximately 4000 or so mitochondrial DNA copies per human muscle cell. copy number of mtDNA per diploid nuclear genome in myocardium was 6970 ± 920, significantly higher than that in skeletal muscle, 3650 ± 620 (P = 0.006). This makes it far ...


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So cryopreservation would be the long-term mode of storage, and you'd do something like store your sample in a cryonic freezer supplied w/ liquid nitrogen at -196C. Cellgro provides some recommendations for cryopreservation here. Keep in mind, cryonic freezers are typically pricey, but broady, the idea is you need to keep your cells at the right temperature, ...


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take the gene names and copy all of them, next open an online tool called gene mania. paste all your genes on the window. you will get their interaction and other related genes. Now go to a database called gene cards and type in all the gene you got from gene mania and paste it one after the other to get useful information about the individual genes. some of ...


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SNPs are much denser than RFLPs and VNTRs therefore the DNA resolution is much greater with SNPs. VNTRs were historically used for linkage mapping while SNPs allowed for association studies (e.g. GWA studies). Therefore your question goes down to what are the differences between linkage mapping and association studies. They are both forward genetic methods ...


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Also try putting the list through Reactome or String DB to see if you see mapping to certain pathways. http://string-db.org/ You can also put lists through ConceptGen to carry out ontology based analyses http://portal.ncibi.org/gateway/conceptgen.html


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Was getting long in the comments. In light of your comments, you might be interested in Gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA). You can do a GSEA using your set, the other one coming from reference databases such as MSigDB (see here). You can categorize your list by gene families using this technique for example. You can get an idea of what cellular process ...


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It depends; what species are the genes from? Some organisms have extensively annotated genomes, and actively curated species-specific databases, while other species may not even have a reference genome sequence available. By itself, a priori, if you were lucky, about all you list would tell you was how to spell the names of those genes--if you're lucky. But ...


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I would suggest searching the name in any trusted genetics database such as NCBI's GenBank (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/). You can just Google search it, but it may take a little longer to find useful information that way. I hope this helps and good luck with your research, CDB


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Ns are not non-recombinant at the genomic level. What you know is that they do not show recombination events at the risk allele locus as subjects carrying the marker A1 show signs of the disease and similarly healthy subject do not carry the marker A1. Hence they are called non-recombinant. On top of that 3rd generation subjects (excepted III6) show ...


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This should be pretty easy to demonstrate. Over the two generations, there would be 200-300 mutations in the entire genome of 3.3*109 base pairs, i.e. about 1*10-7 of the base pairs should be altered. If Time Traveler is male, for example, imply sequencing the Y chromosome and mitochrondrial DNA and comparing to the paternal grandfather and maternal ...



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