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My previous answer was to the original question which focused on red blood cells which do not contain DNA. Now the question has been revised to focus on tissue transplantation, where the cells do contain foreign DNA, my amended answer deals with a couple of the points raised, but only briefly with the question of identification. Incorporation of foreign DNA ...


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Adding to @David's answer, there has been some recent work looking at Neanderthal DNA in the context of Denisovan and modern human populations. David Reich's group [Sankararaman et al. Nature 2014] found Neanderthal-derived alleles in genes that affect skin and hair (specifically keratin filaments), as well as some that confer risk of disease. Another cool ...


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There was a very readable piece on this topic by Chris Stringer in Nature in 2012. At that time his general conclusion was: It is not yet clear whether the archaic DNA many of us carry is tied to any visible traits. Although he added: More controversially, some of the known differences in coding DNA between Neanderthals and recent humans are ...


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Think about it this way, the G-C content is averaged over the entire genome, and varies between different species. Whether you are dealing with prokaryotes, with relatively compact genomes, or with eukaryotes, with lots of non-coding regions, the open reading frames will, in general, be influenced by the average G-C content across the genome. Therefore we ...


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This may have to do with the fact that the cells require 'housekeeping genes', which are typically constitutive genes that are expressed in all cells of an organism under normal and patho-physiological conditions. Housekeeping and other essential genes are distributed uniformly across different chromosomes thereby making any chromosome indispensable. ...



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