New answers tagged

1

Here's pretty much the first thing that popped up on pubmed:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3144148/ So clearly there are direct neurotransmitter receptors on immune cells themselves. Pick a favorite neurotransmitters and search "xyz and the immune system". However, I can't tell you how relevant that is in terms of actually affecting large ...


0

I believe rather than canonical involvement in T cell activation the question was what role does CD4 and CD8 have in a non-T cell population. Here is an article that provides some interesting insight: CD4 and CD8: an inside-out coreceptor model for innate immune cells http://www.jleukbio.org/content/86/2/251.full


0

Short Answer - If the same antibody works both for IHC and SDS-PAGE it either means it is monoclonal against a surface linear epitope or a polyclonal antibody. Long Answer - Starting off, there are broadly two kinds of antibodies based on the type of the epitopes. The epitope can either be linear or conformational. Here's a couple of pictures that should ...


0

Many but not all B cell epitopes will be destroyed by denaturing. Those that are conformational will be destroyed, but there are also many B cell epitopes that are linear, based on amino acid sequence only without strong conformation dependence. Also, depending on your IHC protocol, there's often a fixation step that involves a certain amount of ...


0

The OP (me) was unclear whether or not the new therapy had to ultimately present antigen specific to a particular naive T-cell. The answer is yes: Each T-cell is specific for a single antigenic determinant. An antigenic determinant is a small portion of an antigen, such as a certain sequence of amino acids in a protein, that the immune system (a T-cell ...


0

We take antibiotics when our own immune system is insufficient to control infections. We do make antibiotics as localized defence systems Defensins and cathelicidins belong to antimicrobial peptides (AMP), called also the natural antibiotics. They are found in Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes, also are synthesized in plants. These molecules were described in ...


-1

I assume from your question (and your pseudonym) that you are confused by terminology. Our adaptive immune system does not make antibiotics, it makes antibodies. Antibiotics are small molecules that interfere with bacterial metabolism. Antibodies are proteins that recognise foreign macromolecules. (You could regard both as “anti-bacterials” — perhaps this is ...


1

Since people and animals routinely get sick, it is obvious that our immune system (which includes but isn't limited to antibodies) doesn't always protect against pathogens. There are many reasons for this, far too many to summarize here, but one common reason is that it takes several days for the adaptive part of the immune system (which includes antibodies,...



Top 50 recent answers are included