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Primary Reference: Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 8th ED. Statement 1 is only part true. B cells produce b cell receptors of a specific paratope, that are randomly determined during maturation. The process of V(d)j recombination, where productive rearrangements in the heavy chain and light chain genes, produces a primary CHtranscript consisting of ...


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Statement 1 is true. Statement 2 is false. My explanation is from the perspective of immune cell development: The antibody-producing B cells are called plasma B cells. Plasma B cells are differentiated from a single naïve B cell (undifferentiated B cell). The naïve B cell have all the cell structure. However, naïve B cell can also be differentiated into ...


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Statement 1 is true and Statement 2, false. B cells, in the absence of antigenic stimulation express surface receptors(B-cell receptors or BCRs), which look like normal secreted antibodies (but these are membrane bound and not secreted). What is amazing is that each B cell at a particular time expresses the same B cell receptor - same as in, all receptors ...


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The dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that process and present pathogens to the T Cells. As such they are present in interfaces where foreign organisms are frequently present. Eg: Skin. When these cells get activated i.e. come in contact with pathogens, they process them and move to lymph nodes to present the processed antigen. Thus these ...


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I’m not an immunologist, but I think it fair to say that antibodies may well be able to bind to certain food or drugs. However there are several reasons that this may not cause their removal or trigger an immune response. These include: Location. If the food is in the stomach I imagine that the digestive environment favours breakdown to sugars, amino acids ...



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