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7

There are a couple of advantages and disadvantages of possessing the eyes of octopuses. The first advantage of the octopus eye is that it has no blind spot. This means that octopuses can see everything that is going on in their environment, and are more aware of predators and prey than some vertebrates. Also, they have many more photoreceptors than ...


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After some more searching, I think stumbled across the answer. It appears to be an… Eriophora ravilla: Source BugGuide.net. This species appears to have quite a diverse range of colors, and even thought I haven't found one that quite matches mine, the other similarities (the large abdomen, the stripe down the back, the four 'dimples', and the ...


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Some moth actually do use clicks for their own echolocation: "Noctuid moths (Noctuidae) are the only group of invertebrates for whom echolocation was demonstrated": Lapshin & Vorontsov 1998 Lapshin et al 1994.


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Asterosaponins are the class of compounds - they have a cholesterol like organic core. Apparently, these saponins make pore-forming complexes with Δ5-sterols of cell membranes, and so are deadly to all usual kind of life, including bacteria and fungi. Quote: Starfish and sea cucumber cell membranes are resistant to their own saponines due to the ...


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As others have indicated, I also haven't seen direct evidence of echolocation in insects. However, there is much evidence that the auditory system of e.g. moths can hear ultrasound generated by bats (Waters, 2003). According to Waters (2003) moths mainly use this to avoid predation. The review also contain many useful references and examples of moth ...


2

This is one of those speculative questions where you don't have a definite answer unless you specifically experiment and find out for yourself. It is a known fact that earthworms breathe through diffusion. It has a thin cuticle over its body and requires moist skin which is achieved by a slimy mucous (reference). It is interesting to note that earthworms ...


1

I can't be certain, but it is probably the pupal shell of a crane fly (daddy longlegs, Tipula palidosa). Here is an image to compare, and you can find lots more with a Google image search. In the UK at least, these are colloquially referred to as leatherjackets and if you find one in soil before the adult has emerged it will often twitch.


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Three factors that influence the number of legs are: 1) Sex : In some species of myriapoda, the females have been found to have more leg segments than males (reference) eg: Himantarium gabrielis 2) age Growth is by adding segments and legs with successive molts (anamorphic), and myriapods continue to add additional segments and legs after they ...


1

Jellyfish move by a form of jet propulsion and it moves in the direction that the head is facing. If it needs to change direction, it just needs to pivot and propel itself in the direction that it needs to move. Comb jellies (which are not really jellyfish) have cilia that beat continuously in the water for it to move forward. So water currents are not ...


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As far as I can tell, the answer is no. It's hard to prove a negative so the best I can do is that none of the articles in the literature I've been able to comb through have any mention of invertebrates at all. What I can give you is that some moths use clicks to jam bat echolocation and some fish are sensitive to echolocation, "raising the possibility ...


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Caenorhabditis elegans is a nematode. Eisenia fetida is an annelid. They both are lophotrochozoans (more specifically, trochozoans). Time of Divergence According to Michael Lynch, there are about 41 amino-acid substitutions per site between Annelida and Nematoda. According to Lynch's data, I estimated that this difference is roughly equal 100 million ...



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