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The answer to the first part of your question can be found on Wikipedia: Agar is a heterogeneous mixture of two classes of polysaccharide: agaropectin and agarose. Although both polysaccharide classes share the same galactose-based backbone, agaropectin is heavily modified with acidic side-groups, such as sulfate and pyruvate. The neutral charge ...


4

It's hard to know what RNaseZap does since the ingredients list is a trade secret. However, I expect it is a lot more than just detergent. RNaseA is extremely hard to destroy; moreover it can easily renature once the denaturant is removed. Therefore, very minute quantities are sufficient to annihilate RNA experiments. The historical method of purification ...


3

Extracellular matrix (ECM) fluoresces, especially Collagen and Laminin. The maximum is in the DAPI and FITC channels and the fluorescence becomes weaker towards longer wavelengths. However, since the coat on the TC flasks is very thin, I would not expect this to be a problem. The best thing is just to try it. There is also a quite famous document available ...


3

The cited article describes effects of Tris on the outer membrane of E. coli. Like all Gram negatives E. coli has an inner (or cytoplasmic) membrane which is a typical phospholipid bilayer membrane containing many membrane proteins including transporters and, of course, an electron transport chain. Surrounding this there is a layer of peptidoglycan, and then ...


2

SYBR green is designed to be much less carcinogenic than ethidium bromide (EtBr). All these gel dyes work by intercalating themselves into the DNA stack between the bases specifically which has a great potential for causing mutations and messing with the workings of the nucleus. My remembrance is that the SYBR and GelGreen/Red etc dyes are large and ...


2

Regardless of what protocol you use, and what the advertised efficacy of that protocol might be, in any situation like this I think the important thing to consider is: what would happen if the material taken from a re-used column was contaminated by a previous application? Can you live with the consequences of such contamination? If you are preparing DNA ...


2

Seems like you have covered the essentials here. I can't think of anything else. Since the Qiagen patent on spin prep columns ran out, these kits are very cheap - $0.40 each? In the 3 or 4 kits Ive used, they all seem to use the same protocol and about the same buffers, so there might be differences in quality or yield but if so, they are small. You ...


2

I always add the Taq to the mastermix. First it makes the handling easier and it avoids pipetting steps which can cause contamination and can also be forgot. Then the enzyme is very stable and will even tolerate room temperature without problem. Since we are going to heat this 30-40 up to 95°C, so this is clearly not problematic. Since the reaction mix is ...


2

Good question. I found this reference in "Molecular Biology: A Project Approach" A phenomenon called photobleaching occurs when ethidium bromide (EtBr) -stained DNA is illuminated by ultraviolet light.... This decreased fluorescence is presumably due to the dissociation of ethidium bromide from the DNA. Ethidium bromide fluoresces when it is in a ...


1

The Ambion's RNAseZAP is not a detergent but contains chemicals that denature RNAse, the step of rinsing with water is necessary in order to clean up the chemicals as well as the denatured proteins left. It is highly recommended as it completely wipes out the RNAse and the experiment can be run safely. No need to risk time, money and samples. So, to sum up, ...



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