Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

While physiological experiments could be conducted without organic solvents, chemical syntheses of DNA or analogs, chemical modification of DNA, and purification after chemical reaction could be performed in the presence of organic solvents. Such experiments are not directly relevant to physiology, but we use chemically synthesized DNA and DNA analogs. In ...


3

DNA in pure water. The only time that nucleic acids would encounter pure water would be in a laboratory setting--for example after an oligonucleotide is synthesized in vitro, the protecting groups are removed from the reactive atoms in the finished sequence and the final product is cleaved from the supporting matrix. At that point you can lyophilize ...


1

Might be considered "not answering the question" but: Option 1: Depending on the type of cells you are using, you can use milder methods to detach cells. Example include Versene which is essentially PBS + EDTA. Milder still is to just use PBS that has no Mg or Ca (no chelation). Option 2: Duplicate your setup - instead of two dishes - one with drug, one ...


2

It would be stressful for cells to be trypsinized 24 hours after seeding. After cells are plated, there is a lag time to start growing. Perhaps, during the lag time, physiological state of cells is stabilized. They have to express proteins digested by trypsin and display on the surface etc. Then you could disturb the state again by trypsinizing cells again ...


1

It is not advisable to trypsinize the cells too often when you have to maintain them. However, in your case the situation is different. Time required to attach depends on cell type. In any case while performing an experiment, your cells should not be already under stress. Therefore you should seed the flasks/culture plates with a smaller concentration of ...



Top 50 recent answers are included