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1

You should, in general read the Material Safety Data Sheet for whatever chemical you are using. This is always provided by the vendor. For RNAse-AWAY (Sigma-Aldrich): Gloves should be worn when handling this product. RNase Decontamination Reagent is alkaline in nature and will cause irritation if prolonged contact with the skin is allowed. In case ...


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If you are doing RNA preps, there isn't much of a way around it. RNase are everywhere and the only way not the degrade your sample is to use proper technique, barrier protection such as nitrile gloves, certified RNase free containers (macrophage tubes, pipet tips, etc.), and saturate your work surface and instruments with RNAse away. If you really have a ...


4

RNase AWAY is marked for Category II skin corrosion/irritation and Category II eye irritation/serious eye damage. Recommendations by the MSDS followed by definitions as follows: Skin contact Wash off immediately with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes. Remove and wash contaminated clothing before re-use. Immediate medical attention is required. ...


0

It seems highly unlikely to me. The smallest microdialysis probes I've ever seen are about 250 ┬Ám in diameter, so about the size of a Drosophila hemisphere. You can deliver drugs by microinjection (well, I assume you can, seeing as a) you can do it in honey bees and b) you can perform whole-cell patch clamp recordings in Drosophila).


-1

One use of indirect testing is used to test for *exposure** to organisms that we wouldn't just naturally recover from as well. One example off the top of my head is HIV. The first line of testing for this infections is simply to look for antibody responses, but because it is not effectively resolved by the patient's immune response, it is important to know ...


0

Here's a nice little walk-through by the CDC on Biosafety levels. Biosafety level reflects that potential risk microbes used (or potentially present in the case of human tissue samples) in the laboratory present to researchers. http://www.cdc.gov/training/QuickLearns/biosafety/ BSL-1 is for very low-risk organisms, like non-pathogenic E-coli. You can work ...


2

My short answer would be no, careers of people who study pathogens requiring biosafety training are not focused biosafety level. More broadly, the people I know who study infections diseases are not motivated by the biosafety levels of their infections organisms. Rather, they are motivated by biological questions and their research that often require ...


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Mouth pipetting, while almost unheard of in modern laboratories in developed countries, is still very much a current protocol in many parts of the world. For example, this paper analyses the proportion of clinical labs in Pakistan and found evidence of poor biosafety practices (emphasis mine): Results: A total of 1,647 (92.4%) males and 135 (7.6%) ...



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