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Although it is not a flow of electrons like in an electronic circuit, it is nonetheless current flow which drives action potential propagation. It could be seen as a positive current flow (outward Na+), followed by a negative one (inward K+) going from dendrite to synapse. In fact, a neuron can be modeled by a a basic electronic circuit with resistors ...


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As far as I was able to find there exists two models of the action potential by using RC circuits. Do note that there is no flow of electrons per se across a tube, but rather a migration of potential. See this. The Hodgkins Huxley model : The Hodgkin–Huxley model, or conductance-based model, is a mathematical model that describes how action potentials ...


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The electrical impulse through the axon is a transverse wave of ions moving in and out. There is no net change in charge to the axon itself. It isn't an electric current at all; it is a transverse chemical wave powered by electric charges.


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Mechanistic model answers the how question. These models are usually biophysically detailed, and designed to be causal. Say you discovered a linear relation between blood pressure drug and heart rate. This would be a statistical model. It doesn't tell you how the two are related biophysically. One could build a detailed model that describes intermediate ...


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As @Corvus said before me, the core of your post talks about mathematical modelling of host-pathogen interactions. The title talks about analyzing omics data. What are you really interested in? I will assume you are interested in modelling of host-pathogen interactions (as @Corvus did). I agree with @Corvus (+1) that Modeling infectious diseases and humans ...


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I'm a bit confused because your title and your question description don't seem to align perfectly (-omics data versus host-pathogen interactions). If you are interested in host-pathogen dynamics, in my opinion, the best general introductory text in this area is Keeling and Rohani Modeling infectious diseases and humans and animals.


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Here is my mistake, I think. $w_i$ can be written in terms of $p_i$ in the following way (note that $p_i$ can only assume two values, 0 and 1): $w_i (0) = w_0 + kb$ $w_i (1) = w_0 -c + (k-1)b$ where $w_0$ is the baseline fitness and $k$ is the number of altruists in the group (so, $k$ can be 0, 1, or 2). When we are calculating $\beta (w_i, p_i)$ the ...


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I am not sure I understood the question. Let me know if this helps. Case: N=2, freq=0.5 Let's assume that the frequency of those who cooperate is 0.5. The slope of the regression line (which R.squared is equal to 1 as we have as many data point than degrees of freedom) is by definition $\frac{\Delta w}{\Delta p}$. You defined $\Delta p = 1$. What is ...


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Hypothesis testing in evolutionary biology Pretty much any paper of empirical evolutionary biology tests hypothesis. If you go on google scholar and look for any empirical paper in the field of evolutionary biology such as "does sexual selection has antagonist effect to natural selection", "evolution of range limits", "evolution of mutational robustness" or ...


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(This isn't an answer, but hopefully it will help get it past the experimental design into just solving the equation.) Where did you get that α0 was not determined from their data? On p. 10 (256), they state, "The prevailing direction of effective pollen dispersal within neighbourhoods (a0) that gave the best fit of the model was 91 degrees from north ...


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This is actually not the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model of the a neuron, however it is highly related to it. I believe the the Equation you have there, is capable of oscilations for any positive values of $\epsilon$, $C$, $L$. I generated this graph with the parameter values all set to 1. Note how it is very similar to a sine wave. I believe you where trying to ...



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