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Most of the lactate produced by tumors probably enters the circulation and is taken up by other tissues (like the Cori cycle, correct). There are several studies like this one measuring glucose uptake and lactate release by tumors in vivo, and it is clear that a substantial amount of lactate is released into the veins draining the tumor site. Oxidation of ...


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depends on how much injected, you could just feel lightheaded or you might get yourself into an insulin induced coma, serious cases, yeah, one could die. There's a certain blood insulin level that the body can naturally compensate to maintain homeostasis, like I said before, depends on the injected amount. sidenote - Watch 'A Beautiful Mind', it shows the ...


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It is possible to overdose and die of an insulin injection. Obviously, if enough is injected fast enough, the body can't recompense appropriately and and the person would die of hypoglycaemia. Below around 20mg/dL of blood sugar levels in the blood you are likely to suffer brain damage and eventually death.


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I think this is a difficult question for which the answer is not clear --- to my knowledge there is little data on metabolism in solid tumors, and no clear consensus in the scientific community. So I'm not going to attempt to give a definitive answer, but here's at least a few thoughts / opinions. Why transformed cells engage in aerobic glycolysis, or the ...


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The outside of the tumor has access to the most nutrients and oxygen, sometimes even the blood supply (angiogenesis). Solid tumors have this microenvironment if you will, and the human tumor microenvironment often suffers from a lack of oxygen and nutrients, and acidosis (Milosevic et al., 2004). The distance from the outside of the tumor to the core has an ...


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A year and a half later, I stumbled upon this article by Ars Technica. To summarize, research/experts acknowledge that the calorie system is a poor way to measure human metabolic performance. Gut fauna, calorie measuring device differences, and caloric differences produced by different levels of cooking all contribute to this system being unreliable. To ...


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Each of us burns approximately twice our body weight in ATP every day. So double your body weight and divide that number by the number of seconds in one day; that will give you the average mass of ATP. N.B. a person with a higher mass will have a higher answer.


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ATP burned per minute is not a useful number because the turnover is so high. 2000 kcal/day is dozens of kilograms of ATP so obviously ATP is turned over more than once a day, but there's probably more than one molecule of ATP being passed around between all the ATP synthases. This blog claims 250 grams. Taking the estimate of ATP concentrations(1-10 mM) ...



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