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ATP is the end result of breaking apart glycogen. This isn't a trick question imo, it's in every textbook that glycogen is a primary store of "will soon become ATP" materials, like glucose. The keyword here is "primary," as there are other ways of getting and storing ATP... that is, putting oxygen and glucose into the cells, and then there is always ...


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Points to bear in mind That the biological coupling of an energetically favourable and unfavourable reaction (I would avoid using the term spontaneous†) is done through a composite reaction involving all the components of the two separate reactions. The reactants and products are the same as in the sum of the separate reactions — so it is valid to ...


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If you are only given glycogen and ATP as choices, then glycogen is the correct answer. The reason for this is, that muscle cells need ATP also for other very important processes (such as keeping the membrane potential stable and preventing cramps). Thus, while ATP is the actual fuel that powers myosin to create the muscle force, the cell needs to keep the ...


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This is a typical MCQ which in order to answer you have to have been at somebody’s lectures or be able to read his mind. The antithesis of education! Cells don’t store energy like car batteries. Glycogen in muscle is a store of carbohydrate. It can be used to generate ATP if it is broken down to glucose and the glucose glycolysed. I wouldn’t have chosen ...


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Keep in mind that there needs to be an enzyme present to "couple" two reactions. You can imagine it like the energy from the ATP hydrolysis pushing the enzyme to a high energy state, and from that high energy state the enzyme can push the secondary reaction against the equilibrium. You could do this, and there might even be examples (maybe for some ...


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Glucose concentration in the blood is a highly regulated biologic variable. From personal laboratory experience, it is very difficult to raise a healthy, non-diabetic individual's blood glucose over about 6.5-7 mM (i.e. 120-130 mg/dl). My best guess at where the highest glucose concentration might be in the body is within the hepatic portal vein that drains ...


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The question is a little bit dubious, because when the OP says "seed" we tend to think about the seed before germination. If you are talking strictly about the seed, it doesn't absorb from anywhere: the seed normally contains inside it all the macro and micro nutrients necessary for the first days after germination. Of course, after a while, the growing ...


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Many ions are absorbed by the plants via the action of bacterias. Fe or B for example require chelating action from microbes. P and S need to be oxidised to enter the plant as well. Source: Le sol, la Terre et les Champs - http://www.sangdelaterre.fr/index_135_151.html


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Good article, please allow me to comment: Both hormones cortisol and glucagon are insulin-antagonistic (=anti-insulin hormones). Glucagon differs from cortisol because it is a peptide hormone and cannot cross cell membrane. It must be injected like insulin. Glucagon is released from α-Langerhans cells in the pancreas during the acute stage of hypoglycemia ...


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If you had to chew to digest, then beverages like sugary sodas would never be digested or provide calories or nutrients, as you (generally) don't chew when you drink them. No, chewing is not required for digestion or nutrient absorption. Chewing is important when eating solid foods, as the chewing action breaks down and begins to solublize the food, and ...



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