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In a lab there are so many ways of doing this. However, at home is a little tricky. This is what I would do: Keep your bacteria in a liquid media. Liquid Media: make the media out of NaCl and AS CLEAN AS POSSIBLE (distilled if possible) water (concentration 18g NaCl / L). Place a sample of the bacteria into the solution. Freeze solution with bacteria (-20 ...


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It depends where your isolate is from, other bacteria present in ecosystem ect... I would recommend doing plasmid extraction and using nano drop see what you can pickup.


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You should be running qPCR to quantitate how much of a certain mRNA sequence is present in a sample. Remember that there are thousands to tens of thousands of different mRNA sequences present in an RNA prep, not to mention ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, etc. If you then run your RNA prep out on a gel, you're just going to get a smear. Even if you cut out a ...


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Here it is: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/4206623?report=graph This is the same plasmid as in E. Coli J53. This is the newest sequence.


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The problem of off-targets in CRISPR/Cas is often discussed. It was shown that the system allows mismatches up to five basepairs. For your question, if it is helpful to elongate the gRNA: it was shown that truncating the RNA enhances the specificity more than elongating (see also here). So what can we do? Well, there are different methods to improve the ...


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Looks as if you'll have to do some reconstruction work building the full sequence from the information here and elsewhere in this paper: Nucleotide sequence accession numbers.The DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank accession numbers for the sequences reported in this paper are AB031076(the SalI-XhoI 3.0-kb fragment of pMG101), D84187(rDNA for strain S55), D86354 (rDNA for ...


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For most laboratory spectrophotometers the path length in cuvette that holds your sample is 1 cm, and unless another path length for the light is specified you can always assume that the Beer-Lambert Law for absorption of light is using 1 cm. When growing a bacterial liquid culture in an incubator, the OD (wavelength is usually 550 nm or 600 nm) is a ...


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If you are lucky and live in a university town with student shops, which are run by student organizations, I would recommend you to visit one of those shops. Often they sell used microscopes, which are no longer needed. If you do not mind that these microscopes have been used before, you will get a much better quality for less money. If you go to such a ...


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So there are a couple of things you should ask yourself: a) how 'small' do you want to see b) what are you trying to study - (microspores can differ depending on that. Examples: Microbiology - (bacteriology), Plant biology...) 200 dollars for a 'proper prof. microscope'I do not think is enough. However I do not think that is what you are looking for (For ...


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When you talk about organisms like fungi and bacteria which can have a dormant form, and viruses, "dead" becomes somewhat harder to define. In fact, it has not been definitively defined for bacteria. I would have guessed "when they are permanently unable to reproduce", but I may be wrong. From one source[1]: The observed coordinated gene expression ...


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Definitely not. There is a ton of variation from gene to gene, otherwise, as you say, regulation wouldn't work. That said, the word "promoter" sometimes gets used in different ways. Especially in eukaryotic systems, people will sometimes say "promoter" to mean the entire region upstream of the gene where transcription factors can bind (for yeast, typically ...


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This is not my area, but as nobody has answered yet I'll start the ball rolling to try to encourage a more authoratative response. Long, long ago, before the internet, when I was a post-doc and the emphasis was on bacterial rather than eukaryotic gene expression, I remember hearing something about specific sigma factors differentially controlling initiation ...


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As a former icu nurse and also a molecular biologist who specialized in genes for antibiotic biosynthesis I can tell you theory is world's apart from practicality. New antibiotics are least tested agents and very expensive, often the patient suffers more from the antibiotics side effects than they do from the infection. Monotherapy is basically old hat now, ...


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Enzootic and epizootic are analogous to endemic and epidemic, respectively. Enzootic means something that affects a population of non-human animals in a limited spatio-temporal region whereas epizootic is relatively more widespread. Endemic and epidemic are more general terms and do not, technically, apply to only humans.



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