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11

First off I'd like to reccomend the University of Dartmouth's publicly available collection located here. They have both SEM and TEM images of a wide range of organisms and cells from algae to see urchins through everything from cholera to mammalian cells. Images are high quality, fully captioned and properly attributed. I'm a little confused as to the ...


10

I agree with @Jeremias Brand's answer. Pretty much you will have to forget about fluorescence microscopy... you can probably find some dusty old one on eBay in your price range, but it probably won't be any good. However, the good news is that seen that in your comment you mention a) plants, b) blood, c) liquids such as wine, d) food? transmitted ...


8

David Orloff's The Cell – an Image Library has thousands of SEM images.


8

With all respect I think the accepted answer underestimates the quality of current inexpensive instruments. What I have found comparing images on my recently acquired $400 scope to those produced by top-end Nikons is that it produces images which are aesthetically less appealing but nearly identical in detail. Mostly I have used it for fungi, which are ...


7

From the comment section: I would go with a cheap one with a magnification of ~40X. According to this source, 10-20X is already sufficient to see large protozoans and algae in a pond. Here some suggestions on what you could look at.


6

Have a look at: XTALENT Image Gallery, more than 600 images, last updated in 2006, though. Dennis Kunkel Microscopy, Inc., "scientific stock photography library of light microscope pictures and electron microscopy images featuring science and biomedical microscopy photos". Iowa State University SEM library, includes pictures submitted by students from ...


6

This really depends on the application you have in mind. As with other precision instruments there is a huge range of qualities and applications. If you just want brigth field illumination and look at relatively big things ( approx 100 microns) then you could find something decent for the price you mention if you buy used. But if you want more complex ...


6

I know this question is going to close. But, if you want to work something you can work on: Cryo super-resolution fluorescence imaging Highlights CryoFM allows imaging of vitrified biological samples with fluorescence microscopy. There are significant challenges to achieve high-resolution cryoFM imaging. Fluorophore characteristics at low ...


4

Take a look at my website which has a section called Images. http://www.hssemgroup.com/ There are more than 13 sites listed which have hundreds of SEM images posted


4

The word to look for is 'Image segmentation'. But also here, it very much depends on what you're looking at. Segmentation and quantification of simple fluorescence images is relatively easy and widely used. It can get very complex depending on how complex the structure is you're looking at. There are machine-learning approaches which are able to distinguish ...


4

Taken right from the Wiki page you linked to: AFM only images the surface of a specimen, to a maximum depth of 10-20 µm and a maximum scan area of 150 µm x 150 µm. Compared with scanning electron microscopy, SEM has a much larger depth of penetration and scanning area (~1 order of magnitude greater). AFM is also a much slower scanning ...


4

I think you have a good question, but if you want to get a good understanding of the issues you raise with it, then you really ought to consider spending some time reading this optical microscope primer. In my opinion, you need not bother with taking an undergraduate course at a physical university. As an intro to biology (which is not really necessary if ...


4

Higher magnification is definitely NOT always better. Indeed, the microscope you are considering is designed for maximum magnification of 1,000x. The 2,000x is achieved by adding 20x eyepieces BUT it creates what is known as 'false magnification'. 2,000x is beyond the resolving power of a light microscope so what happens is that the image is magnified 2,000x ...


4

It is called a Holliday junction. It forms during recombination.


4

According to Wikipedia: 3 um long with a diameter of 0.5 um. That equates to a length of 30 000 A and a diameter of 5 000 A. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helicobacter_pylori


4

While I doubt that this might be possible in all cases (and I would be careful about classifications), there are indeed some great ressources, which contain a lot of images. Since there is a vast number of bacteria present on this planet, there is of course a limitation to bacteria available in photos, representing only the most common or important. These ...


3

The website you want is The Cell: An Image Library. They also have movies. A quick search of 'Homo sapiens tumor' revealed several Creative Commons videos of tumor cells moving around in vitro with attribution and no annotation or anything else. Sometimes the site can be a bit buggy, but it's a pretty awesome resource when it works.


3

Most of the dyes used for visualization bind with a much higher affinity to dsDNA. This would be SybrGreen, EtBr (although this will bind RNA as well). There is a pretty comprehensive website from Life Technologies about Nucleic acid stains that is worth a look. There is as well a publication on this topic: "DNA Staining for Fluorescence and Laser Confocal ...


3

To start with, CLARITY is a whole-brain imaging technique , there is no need for sectioning which destroys connections and can cause the brain slices to warp as they are being cut. The costs for setting up CLARITY are much lower because all that is needed is chemicals to get the prep ready for imaging whereas in the Nat Methods paper you have to set up an ...


3

Does this look like the same bug to you ? . This one is a bulb mite, Rhizoglyphus robini, see here.


3

I agree with Kevin F, if I was you, I'd take a bit of training before buying something or even trying. Biology teachers or staff from the university are usually happy to provide you with a microscope to test something, so just ask. If you want a resolution that high, there are a lot of adjustments to do, commonly referred to as "Köhler illumination", because ...


3

Well it depends on the application. First you have to determine what it is that you want to view under the microscope e.g. an organism such as Drosophila or you want to see microscope slides? In the first case you need to by a dissecting microscope, otherwise you need to by an upright light microscope with the appropriate objective lenses, again depending on ...


3

When testing an antibody for an imaging application, it is almost always a good idea to test it in another application like ELISA or Western blotting to see if it binds the target of interest. For example, try to find high- and low-expressing cell lines, load equal amounts, and see if there is a difference in signal at the expected molecular weight. Check ...


3

Nature Methods seems to publish quite a few methods that facilitate this kind of analysis. E.g. http://www.nature.com/nmeth/journal/v8/n3/full/nmeth.1558.html And an editorial from them: http://www.nature.com/nmeth/journal/v9/n7/full/nmeth.2102.html As part of a special issue on BioImage Informatics with some nice examples. ...


3

ImageJ is a multi platform piece of software that has a cell counter module that might be of some use, and hey its free! Its easy to use and so ludicrously crude that it is very versatile. I remember using it in undergrad to count cells under the microscope automatically after a few image contrast tweaks. I don't see why this couldn't be reapplied to count ...


3

The imnstrument is shown here upside down. If it is turned around, it looks like this: The glass disc are placed around the middle tube. The operation principle can be seen in this image: The specimen is placed in the tube in the middle and pushed out by turning the knob at the bottom. The minimal increment for this kind of microtome is 10 micrometers. ...


3

It is true for most viruses. They have a size of roughly 1/100 of bacteria (or smaller), so they are too small to be seen in light microscopy. According to Wikipedia the maximum limit with light microscopy is around 1500x magnification (or making structures, which are at least around 200nm in size visible). A lot of viruses are smaller, for example the ...


3

No. Although malaria is transmitted through the saliva of a female Anopheles mosquito, it stays in the bloodstream and doesn't pass over to the saliva of humans (otherwise it probably would be transmittable via humans directly). Once the parasites travel to the liver, it infects and bursts hepatocytes after reproducing (asexually). The burst cells then ...


3

If you're not already doing so, make sure you set up Kohler illumination every time you use the microscope -- see this tutorial by Steven Ruzin. The lamp or the phase ring may be misaligned. There are usually small hexagonal set screws on the lamp housing and the condenser, respectively, to adjust these. Imaging near the edge of a dish or well can lead to ...


2

There have been experiments with Live-cell dSTORM with SNAP-tag fusion proteins in Markus Sauer's lab in Würzburg. If you are using the physiology definition of in-vivo, I'm pretty sure some of my co-workers have measured on live organisms. However, this is work in progress and not fully published; if you are interested, you should ask Markus Sauer directly. ...



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