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4

According to Wikipedia: 3 um long with a diameter of 0.5 um. That equates to a length of 30 000 A and a diameter of 5 000 A. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helicobacter_pylori


3

I know this question is going to close. But, if you want to work something you can work on: Cryo super-resolution fluorescence imaging Highlights CryoFM allows imaging of vitrified biological samples with fluorescence microscopy. There are significant challenges to achieve high-resolution cryoFM imaging. Fluorophore characteristics at low ...


1

Virtual fly brain (http://www.virtualflybrain.org/site/stacks/index.htm) is an excellent database of fly (Drosophila) brain sections, which can be electronically processed/annotated/highlighted on the fly to show different areas of the fly brain as an overlay on top of the original images. Alternatively, you can use BrainTrap ...


1

It depends on the type of microscope you want to buy. Most microscopes come with a slide with precise measurement bars on them and you select the objective and if it is connected to some sort of camera and comes with a software then you can calibrate the scale bar for a particular objective using the software it comes with. Otherwise if you know the pixel ...


3

It is true for most viruses. They have a size of roughly 1/100 of bacteria (or smaller), so they are too small to be seen in light microscopy. According to Wikipedia the maximum limit with light microscopy is around 1500x magnification (or making structures, which are at least around 200nm in size visible). A lot of viruses are smaller, for example the ...


3

The imnstrument is shown here upside down. If it is turned around, it looks like this: The glass disc are placed around the middle tube. The operation principle can be seen in this image: The specimen is placed in the tube in the middle and pushed out by turning the knob at the bottom. The minimal increment for this kind of microtome is 10 micrometers. ...


2

Very popular microscopes for bio work these days are the inverted style, These allow you to view samples without preparing slides. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverted_microscope http://www.biotechequipmentsales.com/equipment-for-sale/details/564/14/microscopes/nikon-eclipse-ts100


6

With all respect I think the accepted answer underestimates the quality of current inexpensive instruments. What I have found comparing images on my recently acquired $400 scope to those produced by top-end Nikons is that it produces images which are aesthetically less appealing but nearly identical in detail. Mostly I have used it for fungi, which are ...


8

I agree with @Jeremias Brand's answer. Pretty much you will have to forget about fluorescence microscopy... you can probably find some dusty old one on eBay in your price range, but it probably won't be any good. However, the good news is that seen that in your comment you mention a) plants, b) blood, c) liquids such as wine, d) food? transmitted ...


5

This really depends on the application you have in mind. As with other precision instruments there is a huge range of qualities and applications. If you just want brigth field illumination and look at relatively big things ( approx 100 microns) then you could find something decent for the price you mention if you buy used. But if you want more complex ...



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