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Telomeres do not "cause" ageing as such - although you are right that they limit the number of times a somatic cell can divide. Each time a cell divides the chromosomes are replicated in an imperfect way, and as such a small amount of DNA is lost from the end of the chromosome during each round of cell division. Telomeres are just extensions to the ...


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Errors in division occur all the time and can show up in any dividing cell; this is, of course, important for cancer biology. If one of my cells replicates oddly right now it likely won't matter since it's only one out of trillions, but if that happened at a very early age in development it could be present in many if not all of my cells. Identical twins ...


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Colchicine inhibits the formation of the microtubules by binding to tubilin and rendering it unavailable for the polymerization. Thats why the cells get arrested in the metaphase and can not go on further in the cell cycle and divide. For chromosome studies this is very useful since this is the phase where the chromatin is most condensed and can be viewed ...


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well i had done some search on this before but not for CHO (I checked for the cells that I was culturing). i can look up for more. Just pasting the data that I have right now. Cell type Total G1 S G2 M S+G2/G1 Ref Neuro2a 9 2 5 1.5 0.5 3.25 De Laat et al 1980 PNAS Hela 16.2 7.7 7.2 ...


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Identical twins do start out identical, but their DNA will quickly diverge. Not in a dramatic way, but in point mutations, at random locations, in different cells. Think of how there is a certain error rate associated with DNA replication - so even from that very first cell, when it divides to form a second cell, there is a chance there may be mutations in ...


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Question is two years old, and the answer is approx 20 yo, but I believe both are still pertinent: According to Jared Diamond on pg 12 of his Harper paper version (1993 -- but reissued in 2006) of The Third Chimpanzee, we replace intestinal lining epithelium every few days, urinary bladder lining every two months, and replace every red blood cell about every ...


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Cytokinesis is separate from mitosis. What edition are you looking at? To quote from the Fourth Edition: The cell cycle culminates in the division of the cytoplasm by cytokinesis. In a typical cell, cytokinesis accompanies every mitosis, although some cells, such as Drosophila embryos (discussed later) and vertebrate osteoclasts (discussed in Chapter ...


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If you are thinking of a process like meiosis but followed by DNA duplication, the problem is that this would create daughter cells that do not have the same genome as the parent cell. The diploid genome of a sexually reproducing species' cell has different alleles of the same locus. If the cell replicates itself by passing one chromatid to each daughter ...


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Couldn't fit in a comment... To me, your question sounds like "what are the possible advantages of sexual reproduction over asexual reproduction?" but in the meantime you're saying that you're not interested neither in the advantage of recombination nor in the advantage of "independent assortment". I don't quite see what you mean by "independent assortment" ...


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The biggest problem is this: if you have only one copy of the DNA how is it going to divide it between the two cells so that both have a complete copy?



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