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4

Based on T Abraham's answer, a hemocytometer would work. However, a hemocytometer requires a microscope, but if you are in a cell lab, you probably have access to a microscope. I would recommend using mammalian cells instead of bacteria, they're larger and easier to see, and more relevant to human health. If you're interested in liver toxicity in particular, ...


4

Great idea! It seems that this research has been done before and your hypothesis is correct, but testing a wide variety of alcohols and testing your hypothesis for each one of them would be a great project. Now, to do this, I would expect you would need to check the growth of the cells after certain periods of time. How would you do this? Well, the best ...


3

For assaying effect of alcohol on cell growth:     Prokaryotic Cells Take ~5ml medium (LB for E.coli) in test-tubes/plastic tubes and add appropriate concentration of alcohol(s) in these. Inoculate 1% bacteria from a starter culture (OD~0.6) After different time intervals or a fixed time point take some culture, dilute and spread ...


3

The chromosomes copy at S phase. So S/G2 checkpoint up to early anaphase has 2n. You are on the right track to understanding the cell cycle, important to note the differences between homologous chromosomes (homologous pair) and sister chromatids, while understanding ploidy. During S (synthesis) phase which occurs between G1 and G2 , all the somatic DNA ...


3

Tumors can be benign (they don't bother you at all eg: a mole which does not change) and malignant (also called cancer). The difference is based on:- Degree of differentiation - How much the tumor cells resemble the normal cells Rate of growth - In general (over generalised) benign tumors are slow growing while malignant tumors are fast growing Spread to ...


3

Different cancers divide at different rates. One way to qualitatively visualize this is observe hair loss in patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Commonly, a drug like cisplatin will be administered which will cross-link DNA, inhibiting cell division by activating apoptosis. Tissues which are killed most readily by cisplatin are those which are dividing ...


2

This specific experiment has not been done. Fusing cells is difficult and it also leads to polyploidy. Cells are immortalized by overexpressing oncogenes (or viral replication genes); for example HEK293 cell line was established by transforming embryonic kidney cells with adenovirus. Now transforming a neuron would immortalize it but would also make it ...


2

Question is two years old, and the answer is approx 20 yo, but I believe both are still pertinent: According to Jared Diamond on pg 12 of his Harper paper version (1993 -- but reissued in 2006) of The Third Chimpanzee, we replace intestinal lining epithelium every few days, urinary bladder lining every two months, and replace every red blood cell about every ...


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The mechanism is straightforward: in Metaphase I of Meiosis, chromosomes line up in two lines, with homologous across from each other, which allows them to interact by crossing over. In Metaphase of Mitosis, the chromosomes are all lined up single file, so the homologous chromosomes cannot interact.


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In the case of myofibrils this is the case because of the syncytial nature of that given structure. It means that in developing muscle tissue after a certain stage the cell divisions become somewhat different in that the final step, being separation of the daughter cells via invagination of cell membranes, does not happen. The nuclei though keep dividing ...


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I think you should start with immortalized cell lines and so in vitro division rates by perfect conditions. This is easier to measure than in vivo division rates. E.g. HeLa has a division time of 23 hours. MDA-MB-231 and A549 division times are around 28 hours. Growth of HeLa Cells Comparative Analysis of Dynamic Cell Viability, Migration and Invasion ...


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First off this is called genetic mosaicism and indeed mitotic recombination is a contribution factor. Mitotic crossover events involve the exchange, by homologous recombination, of regions of chromosomes but the main point is that mitotic recombination occurs after chromosomes are replicated and between sister chromatids of each replicated chromosomes (see ...



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