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At the start everyone is 2n, diploid cells. By far the largest difference between Meiosis I and Mitosis is that mitosis results in genetically identical, diploid somatic cells. Meiosis, in it's entirety, results in gametes of haploid genetic information, but the genetic information is not identical due to crossing-over events that happened during meiosis I. ...


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Short answer The spindle is made up of microtubules Background From Nature: Spindle fibers form a protein structure that divides the genetic material in a cell. [...] At the beginning of nuclear division, two wheel-shaped protein structures called centrioles position themselves at opposite ends of the cell forming cell poles. Long protein fibers ...


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For a male, one primary spermatocyte produces two secondary spermatocytes through meiosis I, which in turn produce two spermatids each through meiosis II. So one primary spermatocyte produces four spermatids. That means that $x$ spermatids are produced after $x/4$ meiotic divisions consisting of once meiosis I and twice meiosis II. However, we don't count ...


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The short answer: no. First, let's get an understanding of the cell cycle control system, as there are some important molecules involved in this system that regulate mitosis. Think of the control system as a series of stoplights: as you mention, there is one stoplight at the G2 phase. There are two additional checkpoints: one at G1 and one in the M (mitotic) ...


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What are golgi? Stacked array in the cisternae which are ought to connect vesicles and tubules Made of >1000 different proteins Has the ability to transform/alter in response to a cellular stimulation such as mitosis Fragmentation of golgi during mitosis During interphase, the Golgi receives secretory cargo from the ER via the COP II vesicle ...


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According to this book, during disassembly of the nuclear envelope, the nuclear membranes are broken down into vesicles. The nuclear membranes reform at the end of mitosis as the vesicles bind to the surface of chromosomes and fuse with each other to form a double membrane around the chromosomes (how this happens is not clear, except that integral membrane ...


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@Remi.b I think we can do better than 1962. Let's fast-forward here to 2014, in the post-genomic era. I think this paper provides some data relevant to your query: Possible mechanisms for Chromothripsis .


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Actually, the answer is not obvious. @RoSiv gives the textbook case of symmetric cell division, where the two new cells can indeed be considered identical, and this is valid in many cases. But there are also cases of asymmetric cell division, where the "mother" and "daughter" cell are clearly different. In asymmetric cell division, the parent cell is ...



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