Hot answers tagged

5

So in mitosis, the cell has to split itself into two cells; each daughter cell has a functional genome that may again split into more daughter cells. The cell replicates the DNA before dividing, so the error in replicating 3x or 4x is that upon division, the daughter cells will have more DNA than the initial cell, and every generation will have more DNA than ...


3

The chromosomes copy at S phase. So S/G2 checkpoint up to early anaphase has 2n. You are on the right track to understanding the cell cycle, important to note the differences between homologous chromosomes (homologous pair) and sister chromatids, while understanding ploidy. During S (synthesis) phase which occurs between G1 and G2 , all the somatic DNA ...


3

First off this is called genetic mosaicism and indeed mitotic recombination is a contribution factor. Mitotic crossover events involve the exchange, by homologous recombination, of regions of chromosomes. 60% of homologous recombination events might occur during G1 and 40% of those event occurs after chromosomes are replicated (see this paper). For twin ...


2

Kinetochore (KT) is a multilayer protein complex. It's main function is to link chromosomes to the positive ends of the spindle microtubules. Also it plays role in the formation of heterogenic region at and around the centromer. The attachment of the KT is not uniform among living species. According to this paper on KT assembly in yeast: . ... KTs ...


2

At the start everyone is 2n, diploid cells. By far the largest difference between Meiosis I and Mitosis is that mitosis results in genetically identical, diploid somatic cells. Meiosis, in it's entirety, results in gametes of haploid genetic information, but the genetic information is not identical due to crossing-over events that happened during meiosis I. ...


2

According to this book, during disassembly of the nuclear envelope, the nuclear membranes are broken down into vesicles. The nuclear membranes reform at the end of mitosis as the vesicles bind to the surface of chromosomes and fuse with each other to form a double membrane around the chromosomes (how this happens is not clear, except that integral membrane ...


2

The short answer: no. First, let's get an understanding of the cell cycle control system, as there are some important molecules involved in this system that regulate mitosis. Think of the control system as a series of stoplights: as you mention, there is one stoplight at the G2 phase. There are two additional checkpoints: one at G1 and one in the M (mitotic) ...


1

Actually, the answer is not obvious. @RoSiv gives the textbook case of symmetric cell division, where the two new cells can indeed be considered identical, and this is valid in many cases. But there are also cases of asymmetric cell division, where the "mother" and "daughter" cell are clearly different. In asymmetric cell division, the parent cell is ...


1

@Remi.b I think we can do better than 1962. Let's fast-forward here to 2014, in the post-genomic era. I think this paper provides some data relevant to your query: Possible mechanisms for Chromothripsis .


1

The mechanism is straightforward: in Metaphase I of Meiosis, chromosomes line up in two lines, with homologous across from each other, which allows them to interact by crossing over. In Metaphase of Mitosis, the chromosomes are all lined up single file, so the homologous chromosomes cannot interact.


1

I think you should start with immortalized cell lines and so in vitro division rates by perfect conditions. This is easier to measure than in vivo division rates. E.g. HeLa has a division time of 23 hours. MDA-MB-231 and A549 division times are around 28 hours. Growth of HeLa Cells Comparative Analysis of Dynamic Cell Viability, Migration and Invasion ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible