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The short answer: no. First, let's get an understanding of the cell cycle control system, as there are some important molecules involved in this system that regulate mitosis. Think of the control system as a series of stoplights: as you mention, there is one stoplight at the G2 phase. There are two additional checkpoints: one at G1 and one in the M (mitotic) ...


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Actually, the answer is not obvious. @RoSiv gives the textbook case of symmetric cell division, where the two new cells can indeed be considered identical, and this is valid in many cases. But there are also cases of asymmetric cell division, where the "mother" and "daughter" cell are clearly different. In asymmetric cell division, the parent cell is ...


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Here is a picture to expand on my comment better. From wikipedia: In the above diagram, the red chromosome represents one homolog while the blue chromosome represents the other homolog in the pair. After replication in Interphase, you have two homologs, each consisting of duplicated sister chromatids. You can see how we have the one enlarged cell in ...


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Humans have 46 chromosomes, 23 come from the mother and 23 come from the father. I think The easiest way to remember this is to think of the sex chromosomes--if you are male, you have one X chromosome from your mother and one Y chromosome from your father. During S-phase, the cell will make another copy of the X chromosome and the Y chromosome, so you will ...


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Mitosis: 1. Yes, the spindle fibers attach to centromeres at the prometaphase http://www.biology.arizona.edu/cell_bio/tutorials/cell_cycle/cells3.html Meiosis: 1. The nuclear membrane breaks down in Metaphase 1 and reforms during Telophase. It breaks down again in Prophase 2, reforming after that in Telophase 2 in the daughter cells. The spindles attach ...



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