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2

I can understand your confusion but it all makes sense. The basic idea is that what we call the "antisense" strand is actually the one being transcribed. However, since that is in effect a mirror image, it is much simpler to think in terms of the sense strand. To take a very simple example: 5' ATG 3' <-- sense strand 3' TAC 5' <-- antisense strand ...


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I think I have this figured out. Had to do some math. With our 4 nucleotide system, the number of possible codons is 43 = 64. That is number of nucleotides to the codon length power. The question asks us to determine codon length while giving us the number of amino acids and an upper limit on tRNAs. Using the same formula, #Nucleotides(Codon-Length) = ...


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One of the chief components of centrosome is γ-Tubulin. In this study the authors have reported the effect of γ-Tubulin knockout in mice. Quoting the abstract: Gamma-tubulin regulates the nucleation of microtubules, but knowledge of its functions in vivo is still fragmentary. Here, we report the identification of two closely related gamma-tubulin ...


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There is no literature report saying such a thing. However, I did a cursory check for GWAS study on neuroblastoma. Selected SNPs with p-value>0.05 Converted p-values to a score — -log10(p-value) Mapped the SNPs to genes while calculating cumulative score for a gene I just sorted the genes based on their names, assuming that many paralogs have similar ...


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Genetic code and codons are always used with reference to RNA. When talking about DNA, the the sense strand of a gene is considered its sequence. The anti-sense strand though is the template for mRNA synthesis, does not represent the gene. DNA-codon table has simply U replaced by T. Apart from a wikipedia article, I don't find the term being popularly (not ...


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I concur with @Bez but wish to elaborate on the meaning of 'conserved'. It is generally used in the context of evolution. A conserved characteristic or gene or protein means that it has 'survived' a long time without being altered. As @Bez mentions, certain parts of the protein machinery in eukaryotes is very different from prokaryotes, the latter being ...


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I assume that you mean gene expression regulation when you say genetic processes. The best example for your question would be that of synaptic plasticity in neurons. The immediate responses are obviously that of protein modifications (cell signaling). These are fast responses that have immediate effects but are also quite short-lived. During the long term ...


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Generally speaking, heterochromatin or euchromatin structures mark specific regions to regulate the transcriptional activity and these marks carry the signature of developmental processes as they differ in different tissues (or cell types). Therefore, we should not ignore the developmental processes if we want to understand how such epigenetic marks are ...


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Non-coding transcripts can be as small as 10-15 nucleotides. Once the RNA polymerase initiates, the DNA is melted and the transcription bubble forms. This region is about 10 nucleotides long. But if you are asking the limit of mRNA length, then the answer is different. First of all, to get a protein, the ribosomes have to translate the transcript. To do ...


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If all you cared about was genomic integration, then your best bet would be some kind of sequencing. If you sequence the modified region and the flanking regions you could be sure that the new sequence was present in the genome. It would probably be more interesting to look at how the new genes affect the cell. For example you could look at differences ...


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DNA and RNA are similar, but different molecules. Both are made up of nucleic acids attached to a backbone made of phosphate and a sugar forming a nucleotide. DNA uses the nucleic acids Guanine, Cytosine, Adenine, and Thymine, while RNA replaces Thymine with Uridine. The nucleic acids can form pairs due to hydrogen bonding, which allows the DNA/RNA to ...


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DNA transcription has transcription factors that help facilitate where The RNA polyerase should go and what direction it should go. In a sense, these transcription factors could be considered your primers but its a protein complex not a nucleotide sequence.


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Wobble pairing is just a phenomenon and not a hard and fast rule. There are some justifications for why it should exist and that is why it is still called a hypothesis. And this statement is not true:"the base on the third position of the codon and that on the anticodon need not be complementary". The anticodon residue corresponding to the third residue of ...



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