Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Whatever sequence (plus direction) is target, so enzyme will cut. In your example "correct" and "antiparallel" sequences are two different sites. Actually, your example of 5'-CTTAAG-3' is cut by AflII enzyme.


-1

I found my answer here ISSUES RELATED TO PARTICULAR CLASSES OF VECTORS FOR GENE THERAPY http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/CellularandGeneTherapy/ucm072987.htm#vi


1

You can do with a single gRNA. All that CRISPR-Cas, ZFN or TALEN systems do is introduce a double strand break at a specific site. The DNA gets repaired via two mechanisms — non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ is error prone and it may introduce indels that can compromise with gene function (frameshifts etc). While HR ...


1

The thing we must remember is that during evolution, there occurs many events that may result in genomic reshuffling. Considering your example of MHC, when we look into the evolution of the complexes The classical human MHC contains 224 genes, .... Antibody and T cell mediated immune responses against invading pathogens are initiated through MHC class ...


6

It is called conditional mutation. You flox (put lox sites around) gene of interest and express Cre recombinase driven by tissue-of-interest-specific promoter. Illustration from here: Using chemically-activatable variant of Cre recombinase (cre-ER) you can create knock-out in some cells of tissue of interest, not every. Addition: a bit weird but still ...


6

To be specific: I am talking about adult, somatic gene therapy here, and germline gene therapy experiments is still a landmine when considering ethical reasons. The defective gene codes for a defective protein, that usually plays a part in pathways. Since the protein is also defective, that pathway is also rendered defective because of this protein, and ...


0

I believe the Teacher's answer to part B is incorrect. Since the hemophilia mutation is on the X chromosome, and since human males have only a single X chromosome, it does not make sense to describe the father in the final cross as a "carrier" (I am referring the portion of the answer where it says that there is a probability that each parent is a carrier of ...


1

If you're looking for a strictly and directly DNA-DNA mediated effect (no histones, no transcription involved) I'd look for sequence effects on chromatin remodelling, modulating access of transcription factors (TFs) to their elements. Something about this might be in this paper: Szerlong, H. J., & Hansen, J. C. (2011). Nucleosome distribution and linker ...


0

This seems to be a standard procedure knockout and complementation rescue experiment. Breed 2 can be produced from Breed 3 (assuming the Caspase 9 gene indeed causes cancer when it is not expressed). Firstly, knockout Caspase 9 from a wild type, creating Breed 3. Verify that the cancer phenotype is shown and is statistically significant. Then, ...


0

The key to rapid evolution of viruses is high mutation rate, as pointed by @Chris, and high population size. But can it occur due to internal urge of an organism, say virus? If your question is whether in the case of Ebola the vaccination caused the mutations the answer is no. The vaccination lead to the fixation of some mutations that would have ...


0

This article suggests RNA Pol III formed early in eukaryote evolution, and while there's a lot of conservation, the enzyme-specific subunits result from divergent evolution. Another article suggests the actual increase of subunits, however, is a result of the permanent recruitment of transcription factors to the core RNAP by studying homology of subunits to ...


0

I have looked about the topic and I have asked experts and the best aproximation to know the vertebrate host from arthropod blood meals is targeting mitochondrial genes because you can get clean sequence data due the fact that only one allele is present rather than two. Within the mitochondrial genome, you should select a gene which has been widely ...


2

The three RNA polymerases (RNAPs) are very similar to each other, yet not identical. As described in this article, there are subunits that are specific for each type of polymerases. In addition to providing unique substrates that polymerase-specific subunits bind to give each of the RNAPs their specific functionality, the two largest subunits also shape ...


3

SNPs are much denser than RFLPs and VNTRs therefore the DNA resolution is much greater with SNPs. VNTRs were historically used for linkage mapping while SNPs allowed for association studies (e.g. GWA studies). Therefore your question goes down to what are the differences between linkage mapping and association studies. They are both forward genetic methods ...



Top 50 recent answers are included