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DNA and RNA are similar, but different molecules. Both are made up of nucleic acids attached to a backbone made of phosphate and a sugar. DNA uses the nucleic acids Guanine, Cytosine, Adenine, and Thymine, while RNA replaces Thymine with Uridine. The nucleic acids can form pairs due to hydrogen bonding, which allows the DNA/RNA to store information, if ...


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DNA forms beta, double-helices, producing long nucleotide chains, and RNA forms alpha, single-stranded helices, producing short nucleotide chains.


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DNA transcription has transcription factors that help facilitate where The RNA polyerase should go and what direction it should go. In a sense, these transcription factors could be considered your primers but its a protein complex not a nucleotide sequence.


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Wobble pairing is just a phenomenon and not a hard and fast rule. There are some justifications for why it should exist and that is why it is still called a hypothesis. And this statement is not true:"the base on the third position of the codon and that on the anticodon need not be complementary". The anticodon residue corresponding to the third residue of ...


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You can see this review. There are several different types of alternative splicing (AS) events, which can be classified into four main subgroups. The first type is exon skipping, in which a type of exon known as a cassette exon is spliced out of the transcript together with its flanking introns (see the figure, part a). Exon skipping accounts ...


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Glybera doesn't target all cells, and doesn't target fat processing cells. Glybera is adeno-associated virus 1, which normally infects skeletal muscles. Glybera is delivered by intramuscular injection, so the virus easily infects the muscle tissue. The infected muscle cells produce a variant of lipoprotein lipase that has better activity than normal LPL and ...


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Evidence suggests that the correspondence between DNA codons and amino acids (i.e. the genetic code ) is not random. A good place to start with this interesting topic is the Wikipedia article about the genetic code, in particular, about its origin: Many hypotheses on the evolutionary origins of the genetic code have been proposed. Four themes run through ...


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There is no reason for why a certain codon came to represent a certain amino acid. But some reason is attributed to similarity of degenerate codons. Usually the degenerate codons only differ in their last (third) nucleotide. The corresponding first anticodon in tRNA usually bears a modified nucleotide such as inosine which can (promiscuously) pair with A, C ...



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