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5

In addition to @AliceD's excellent answer, I would like to add that a simple mechanistic relationship between body size and "snappiness" may explain the observed pattern. Basics of biophysics Difference in snappiness may result from difference in the ability to accelerate your movement. An increase in body size over one dimension (=body length) $x$ scales ...


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From the systems theory point of view it is because they have a lot less inertia, so their feedback systems operate much more rapidly, with a 'snap' action.


29

Short answer Intermittent locomotion can increase the detection of prey by predators (rats), while it may lead to reduced attack rates in prey (rats and chipmunks). It may also increase physical endurance. Background Rather than moving continuously through the environment, many animals interrupt their locomotion with frequent brief pauses. Pauses increase ...


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Interesting question! An important factor here is the let-go phenomenon, which is defined as the current level in the arm that will cause the hand to involuntarily grip the current source. When the fingers are wrapped around a large cable, most adults will be able to let go with a current of less than 6 mA. At 22 mA, however, more than 99% of adults will ...


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When the body comes in contact with an electrical power supply, two things can happen. If the current flow is high enough, the body heats up just like a heating resistor, and opposed to the resistor, the body can't handle the heat, thus severe burns occur after electric shock. But if the current is low enough not to burn "the conductor" other effects are ...


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ATP prepares myosin for binding with actin by moving it to a higher-energy state and a "cocked" position. Once the myosin forms a cross-bridge with actin, the Pi disassociates and the myosin undergoes the power stroke, reaching a lower energy state when the sarcomere shortens. ATP must bind to myosin to break the cross-bridge and enable ...


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According to wikipedia and MedlinePlus muscle cramps can be caused by muscle overuse or injury or dehydration and lack of minerals (eg. potassium or calcium). In this wikipedia page you can read about the mechanism of muscle contraction. I'd emphasize and quote the most important parts here: ATP binds to myosin, allowing it to release actin and be in the ...


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Short answer: Due to habituation. You do something enough number of times, then that event ceases to be something new, and your body adapts to it. In this case, you train your body to accept more risks allowing greater lengthening, before it begins to internally signal the muscles that an injury is incoming. Read below for the slightly longer version: ...



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