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As others have said, although certain amino acid substitutions are considered to be conservative, the effect of a particular substitution will very much depend upon the context. Here are some examples: gly>ala can change stability of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gly>ala mutations in a fungal glucoamylase increase thermostability asp>glu in a ...


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There are twenty standard amino acids, and some of them are structurally/functionally similar to each other, such as aspartate and glutamate, or asparagine and glutamine, or glycine and alanine. In general, mutations that cause these amino acid switches don't change the function of the protein, but that's just a general rule - it also depends on where these ...


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I think the term you are looking for is Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNPs). This is when there is a change in a single nucleotide of a gene thus altering its expression. When there is no particular change in the organism from the mutation, it is called a silent mutation. One famous example of SNP is sickle cell anaemia where a change (A to T) of the ...


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I think you are referring to the concept of conserved substitution, which tends not to change the property/function (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequence_alignment) of a protein although thats not necessarily true if the mutated AA (point mutation) changes a functional residue in an enzymatic domain such as GAP or kinase domains or even certain residues ...


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All mutagens are potential carcinogens. Unless the mutagen is highly specific to a site. HPV is not carcinogenic. It causes oncogenic transformation of a cell because of certain proteins that it codes for. Retroviruses can randomly integrate near an oncogene and cause oncogenic transformation (This is a mutation in principle. Not a point mutation though. ...


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I'm no expert on the matter, but just quoting from Wikipedia: Mutagens are not necessarily carcinogens, and vice versa. Sodium Azide for example may be mutagenic (and highly toxic), but it has not been shown to be carcinogenic. It cites Toxicology And Carcinogenesis Studies Of Sodium Azide. So it would appear the answer is no. Not all mutagens ...



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