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6

It is correct that O- and B+ parents cannot produce biological children with A+ and AB+ blood groups, with the exception of a few rare edge cases. Firstly, as noted in the other answer, your grandmother may have the Bombay phenotype. However, this is unlikely, due to the fact that she has been previously hospitalised and it was not noted. Another ...


3

Assuming true paternity and correct ABO blood type detection, your grandma could likely have a Bombay phenotype (h/h blood group), which would make her blood look like the O type: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2268/ This means that she would be double recessive to (and therefore lack) the H antigen, which is a precursor to A and B antigens. She would ...


3

This is a very interesting question, and one that has been at the heart of cancer research for a long time. I think it separates into three issues. Are there non-genetic mechanisms that can induce uncontrolled cell proliferation? Yes, at least in experimental settings. There are many viruses that induce proliferation in its host cell, and viral genes / ...


1

Given the incidence rate of cancer, it is likely that usually multiple somewhat independent events have to occur, so that cancer forms (see the famous interpretation of the underlying data/thinking by Hanahan et Weinberg 2000 ) Epigenetic changes seem to be a likely factor contributing to cancer ( summary of an experiment, where they are also causal/inducing ...



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