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3

Your questions mean basically the same. Birdcare.com says: The situation in which all the eggs in a clutch do not hatch at (more or less) the same time, as is more usual among birds, but have their hatching spread over several days. It is well seen in the various types of raptor, and is an adaptation to a type of food supply which may fluctuate. During ...


7

Definitions of adaptation Unfortunately, there is not such thing as a single, standard definition of adaptation. But for most cases the accurate the author is using is not of much importance as all of the usual definitions totally fit in the sentence without changing the meaning of the concept they want to express. In you case however, the concept of ...


3

The behavior can be explained evolutionarily just like any other trait. It came about either through adaptation, neutral evolution, or as a by-product of another adaptation. An intermediate step, like the one you suggested, is not required. But if it did occur, there's no reason to believe that such a trait would cause extinction. Bloody eyes, whether they ...


2

There isn't always an intermediate step like "oozing blood eyes", I suspect that this particular trait is pretty easily explained by having an area of weakness in a blood vessel that made the lizard bleed under high stress situations. maybe in early version the lizard had to get some trauma or could intentionally hit its head on a rock or something... I ...


2

I'm speculating here, but it's likely that the taste of the blood has something to do with this. The blood of the horned lizard tastes foul to feline and canine predators. Therefore, a small amount of blood leaking out of the eye might put predators off immediately after the first attack, if that attack was aimed at the head. Obviously, this is an advantage ...


-1

If an inbetweener offers a slight advantage to survival, and if the full-fledged trait even more so, then once the full-fledged population becomes sufficiently large, they will have the advantage and the inbetweeners will die out.


12

Mathematician/computer programmer's answer here: There is a continuum of different animals — in fact it's pretty fair to say that every animal occupies a different place on this continuum. They're just not uniformly distributed over the continuum; they're clustered around forms that are most likely to survive and reproduce, and the lowest-energy paths ...


5

More specifically, the lack of observable gradual change between species. Most significant phenotype differences occur over several thousand generations, which means several thousand years on up. While we certainly can create experiments where a controlled form of evolution occurs within a very small time-frame, I'm going to assume that you're not ...


8

Nothing happens to them. Organisms exist. They breed with other organisms who are genetically compatible. We humans might try to categorize them according to certain traits, but our labels are just labels, biology isn't governed by them. Over time, we might see that a population used to have one trait, and its descendants no longer have it, they look ...


14

I am not sure I'll answer your question so let me know if I miss your point or if I help! What factors determine weather some species "stick"? Natural selection is nothing but differential fitness (fitness is a measure of both reproductive success and survival) among individuals within a population. Individuals having greater fitness will leave more ...


6

Typically when both new and old species still exist it is because evolution pushed the new one into a different habitat or role. As a hypothetical example reef fish vs deep water fish and their relative size. Lets say deep water fish evolved into reef fish, but we still have deep water fish. So there were deep water fish that were a little smaller than ...


4

Could not fit in a comment... This sounds like a very basic question in evolutionary biology that often ask for a very long answer. But I think that you may get the answer you're looking for just if we ask you back how many inbetweeners would you expect to exist between the hammerhead shark and whatever is the closest currently living species of the ...


1

Indeed natural selection decrease variability and therefore decrease information and mutation recreate this information. You can think of a bunch of pens of different colors. If you select for the red pens you will decrease the variability in pen colors as the other colors will slowly disappear. If you allow for mutation to occur you will recreate blue and ...



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