Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

Tracing it backwards this was the earliest reference I found via google scholar, it's from 1988 and uses the $r B C$ notation in the format we are used to. Hamilton's rule states that for a social action to be favored under natural selection, rb - c > 0, where c is the cost to the actor in terms of the effect on (usually a reduction in) his expected ...


3

This is directly following the advice of Lande & Arnold (1983), saying: Linear multiple regression can be used first to estimate the forces of directional selection, $\beta$, and their standard errors. Then a quadratic multiple regression (16) or (Al), can be used to estimate the forces of stabilizing selection, $\gamma$, with their standard ...


5

First of all, here is a program which simulates the evolution of the G-matrix over multiple generations, it's a few years old (they seem to have stopped developing it) and I've only played with it briefly. This could solve how to model the evolution of the G-matrix. Fisher's fundamental theorem is a great place to start off with the theory of this: The ...


3

I am presenting a speculative approach since nobody has mentioned about any existent models yet. Assuming that selection is based on performance in certain tasks; performance is a function of traits which in-turn is a function of genotype. Performance is a non-linear function of genotype and selection imposes a cutoff/bandpass filter on the performance ...


2

There was a paper that attempted to assess this published in 2010 There’s plenty of time for evolution - Herbert S. Wilf and Warren J. Ewens There is also a layman's explanation of this here Basically when we account for the fact that genes evolve in parallel under a number of simultaneous trials, it appears that there is indeed enough time for species to ...


1

I think there is some misunderstanding there, natural selection does act on an individual and can be determined by its genes (assuming there is genetic variance underlying the variance in trait). Those with more favourable genes will have more favourable phenotypes and thus be more likely to survive/reproduce. However, (genetic) evolution does not occur ...


2

I think you have misunderstood the passage. Here is a larger section (found at google books): Natural selection can also occur at the level of species, for certain characteristics enhance the rate of origin of new species or diminish the likelihood of species extinction. For instance, the number of species in lineages of herbivorous insects has generally ...



Top 50 recent answers are included