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It seems that speech can be recovered after total glossectomy, although it's not a short or an easy process. Here's one case: a case study, reporting the evaluation and evolution findings of the speech-language pathology rehabilitation of the swallowing and speech functions of a 58-year-old man submitted to total glossectomy in June 2009. After ...


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You can whisper without a larynx. "Patients who have undergone partial or full laryngectomy are typically unable to speak anything more than hoarse whispers, without the aid of prostheses or specialized speaking techniques." (source) So the remainder of the vocal tract is capable of enough modulation to present typical human speech in many languages. I ...


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Speech is generated by generating a frequency spectrum with the vocal folds, and then filtering it with the upper vocal tract. Whistling is done by blowing air over shaped tongue and lips. So, give someone a laryngectomy. They still retain the upper vocal tract (and so can still whistle), but they cannot generate the source vibrations to speak. Do it as ...


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Short answer(s) Someone with a damaged larynx may still speak with the use of a speech aid (electronic larynx). The ability to understand speech does not necessarily mean one can speak normally. There are neurological disorders where folks can understand speech, but have difficulty producing it. Background A full removal of the larynx (laryngectomy) ...


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Your image comes from the wiki page Aneurysm. The figure legend on the wiki page identifies it as: Angiography of an aneurysm in a cerebral artery I am not an MD so I chose to first dig up a similar appearing cerebral angiography with the aneurysm identified (dark protruding spot indicated by the arrow): Source: WestJEM, UC Irvine Taking into ...


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Interesting question. Here what I think (I am not an expert in congenital analgesia so take it with a grain of salt). The pain provoked by an high temperature is mainly transmitted via the receptor TRPV1 (a Ca2+-channel nocireceptor) while cold sensation is driven by TRPM8 and possibly, for noxious cold, via TRPA1 (two similar types of Ca2+-channels). Those ...



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