Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Its not clear that this is true. Working with animals has been a little disconcerting over the past 50-60 years. In the distant past, I think most evolutionary anthropologists and their like bought into the idea that humans were completely uniquely intelligent and spiritual. But the more we try to define human sensibilities apart from other animals, the ...


8

Neurons communicate electrochemically. That is, when a signal arrives to a neuron it fires a series of electrical signals, called action potentials. Action potentials are depolarization events that propagate along the neuronal membrane, down to the neuronal terminal. The terminal of a neuron is (with some exceptions) in contact with another neuron, via a ...


4

The neurohormones in most mammals include oxytocin and vasopressin, both of which are produced in the hypothalamic region of the brain and secreted into the blood by the neurohypophysis (part of the pituitary gland). A second group of neurohormones, called releasing hormones, also originates in the hypothalamus. The members of this group, however, are ...


4

There is no widely-accepted neurological structure that mediates 'consciousness.' Even if some structures have been shown to be necessary for consciousness, they have not been shown to be sufficient. This is true with anesthetic mechanisms as well -- their ability to paralyze and block pain signals is fairly well-understood, but the mechanism of ...


4

The key to understanding this is to digest the fact that there are two gates blocking a normal sodium channel. These gates are called the activation gate (on the extracellular side) and the inactivation gate on the intracellular side. Both of these together, or any one of these alone, if closed, can block the sodium current from entering the cell. In ...


3

It is thought that there are no active optical receptors in the brain normally, its possible some effect might show up in the future, it would be minor at best. Shining light into the brain is standard procedure in optogenetics experiments. A subpopulation of neurons is transformed to express an optical receptor to modulate genetic or signalling properties ...


3

A combination of differentiation site, chemical guidance during migration, and signaling cues form a variety of sources. The final step in the generation of an oligodendrocyte is the development of a mature myelinating phenotype, and this is largely regulated by axonal signals. It seems likely that both soluble and cell mediated signals from ...


3

In terms of cell bodies? Zero. There are autonomic projections from the spinal cord (sympathetic) and vagus nerve (parasympathetic) to the sinoatrial node, the atrioventricular node, and at discrete points in the atria and ventricles.


2

As you've already mentioned, cells near the primate macula tend to make one to one connections. Due to this lack of convergence they can be somewhat smaller than normal cells (particularly in the size of their dendritic arbors) earning them the moniker "midget" ganglion and bipolar cells (also P cells). By reducing the magnitude of photoreceptor ...


2

One pathology affecting the vagus nerve is autonomic neuropathy which can be secondary to several causes-one of the most commonly acquired cause is diabetes mellitus. It can manifest with various symptoms such as resting tachycardia (heart beating fast without exercise), exercise intolerance, orthostatic hypotension, constipation, gastroparesis (delayed ...


2

I've found the answer. The entire brain and spinal cord is bounded by the arachnoid mater, thus both channels would lead into the subarachnoid space, which also circulates the fluid into the spinal cord region. The CSF exits through the arachnoid granulations, which are like valves, found on the dorsal midline, into the superior sagital sinus, where it ...


2

I think that depends somewhat on how the human dies - in particular on the conditions. If they die in a very cold environment (say at the top of some icy mountain range), they'll freeze and metabolic processes will slow down considerably, and so will cell death. But such hypothermia-based slowing down is a special case. Normally, if your heart stops or you ...


1

The sensory and motor components are required (GP and vagus respectively). Similar to the corneal reflex and cranial nerve 5 and 7, if a lesion exists in either the sensory or motor component there will be a defect. In your case, there is no motor innervation on the left due to the lack of the vagus nerve so there is no vagus nerve response.


1

I think that most mature cells do not divide in all tissues. If organism need to repair tissues, it uses tissue cell precursors -- stem cells. In case of neurons, these are neuroblasts. Neuroblasts can divide and can repair brains under some circumstances (I don't know under which). There is a cancer grown from neuroblasts, called neuroblastoma. I think ...


1

You are confusing different functional systems. Epinephrine released by the adrenal medulla circulates in the blood and indeed dilates the blood vessels in skeletal muscle. This ensures that enough oxygen and nutrients are available for the muscles to perform in a fight/flight response. The somatic nervous system utilises acetylcholine not as a hormone but ...


1

Although current research has little to say about the effects of exercise on personality, there has been recent correlations demonstrated between personality and the "drive" to exercise--specifically, aggression as a personality trait has been linked to higher metabolic rate. See http://phys.org/news206006380.html for more information about this. The ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible