Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

I think this is mostly caused by hyperventilation. The excessive breathing disturbs the balance between CO$_{2}$ and oxygen in our lungs. This will cause a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Respiratory_alkalosis (the blood pH, which is normally strictly regulated, gets higher), which can cause dizziness, headaches and fainting. The shift in pH can also disturb ...


3

I noticed that a strong background signal in the alpha-wave range was existent at ~10 Hz, but then after a while of doing other things and coming back to it the strong background signal at 10 Hz disappeared but a strong background signal at a smidgen over 8 Hz was present instead. Alpha-waves (7-13 Hz) are related to a dozen of things. Here is an easy ...


2

What one thinks, no matter how intuitive it may appear is not particularly relevant in science. The inductance associated with a neural axon has been well documented since Cole (1966). Its role in the propagation of neural signals is developed extensively in http://neuronresearch.net/hearing/pdf/7Projection.pdf#page=39 . The actual development begins ...


2

This question is more of a medical question than one of the underlying mechanisms of biological function. The formation of long term memories is related to long-term potentiation. There are multiple neurotransmitters involved in this process. Ethanol primarily affects NMDA receptors. Drugs used to specifically induce anterograde amnesia, like propofol, ...


2

I think Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis might be what you are looking for, it is the closest thing I can think of right now.


2

Ok, let's talk about mammalian neocortex rather than about the entire central nervous system. The vast majority of synapses within the cortex are formed between neurons within the same cortical area (Binzegger et al 2004). Although most of these synapses will not be self-connections (from a single neuron back to itself), they are recurrent in the sense that ...


2

The biological part of the answer to your question depends on the thing causing the pain. Burning for example, a large burn can be very life threatening biologically but small burns are not as harmful comparatively. But the psychological harm they would cause is phenomenal. This is because large burns open up the body to infections, dehydration and a lot of ...


1

This is what researchers are trying to do with machine learning algorithms. There have been certain successes but the field is still in its infancy. Typically one tries to decode ("read the mind") between few simple classes, e.g. does the person see a happy vs. sad face. The input to the algorithm can be EEG, MEG, fMRI, etc. See e.g. ...


1

Pressing on the chest changes the concentration of dissolved gasses in the blood stream. Your brain reacts due to excessive oxygen in the blood. This is oxygen toxicity. Why the brain generates vivid imagery when unconscious is a big topic. There's a theory that correlates dreams with a lack of cognitive stimulation. This is called autostimulation and may ...


1

I am not sure whether I grasped the gist of your question appropriately, but let me provide some clarifications. $\text{Nerve}$ is simply a collection of axons. Therefore, all the spinal nerves are just bundles of assorted nerve axons. Now, the origin of nerve is slightly ambiguous as far as its meaning is considered. It can mean the physical origin, ...


1

Unlike a computer, the speed at which any brain can perform a computation is related to the number of synapses it goes through. This means fewer synapses in series correlate with decreased reaction time. An example of fewer neurons correlating with a decrease in reaction time is exemplified in sensory neurons. All sensory nerve cell bodies are all located ...


1

there is no question there is a rough correlation between neuron count and intelligence capability in a general way from looking at the biological species "spectrum" outside of humans. see wikipedia list of animals by number of neurons. eg in wide differences such as comparing insects vs primates etcetera. there is also a rough correlation of neuron count ...


1

Thanks for your answer Alexandria, As you didn't seem entirely confident about the innervation in the skull bone, I ended up asking the neurosurgeon, and she indeed only anaesthetises the skin surrounding the drill hole and the subcutaneous tissue as the bone does not have nociceptive innervation in that area. So you are right for the leg: if chopped off, ...


1

The use of spikes is a mixture of their computational advantages and the limitations of the biological substrate in which they are implemented: They can travel long distances at high speeds because they can profit from the saltatory conduction which is much faster than diffusion and it can be maintained over long distances. A digital signal is less prone ...


1

The brain is separated into different regions, and different regions perform different tasks Not really. This kind of claims stem from the early brain research, where every area was thought to specialize in one particular task. Sure, some categorization is possible (e.g. where the visual input is mostly processed). However, your question is basically an ...


1

We don't know yet in detail how different cortical areas are wired up, so it's difficult to say to what extent the wiring differs. But the overall structure of different cortical areas is remarkably similar, in terms of the layers of cortex and their cellular components. Certainly the structure of the input is very different between cortical areas, and ...


1

It's for control, coordination and balance. From a mathematical point of view, parallel lines won't intersect and thus line A won't affect line B unless they intersect and thus would hardly influence the other unless and an external force is applied to any of the lines. This is also why corpus callosum connects the left and the right side of the brain.


1

I can make a rough analogy in terms of digital media storage. Our memories exist as a relationship between our perceptions and our sensations. Computers store input readily. However, humans store memories perceptually. This means who we are and how we remember an event permanently changes our recollection. If you look at the progression of lossy video ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible